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MMJ State Guide

Want to know the differences between the states in the law on medical marijuana? Then you’ve come to the right place!

 

When it comes to marijuana, Americans overwhelmingly supportive of medical use. Some polls and surveys show that up to 83% of Americans support the use of medical marijuana. This is a massive change from even 10 years ago, when people were still hugely sceptical of the concept of medical marijuana.

As of today, 29 states (and two territories/districts of the United States in Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.) have legalized medical marijuana, and 8 states have legalized both recreational and medical marijuana. It is likely that all 50 US states will have some sort of medical marijuana program within the next decade, and the idea that cannabis should remain a schedule I, federally illegal substance looks more and more laughable day-by-day.

Medical Card Online

Telehealth/telemedicine makes getting a medical marijuana card so much easier.  There are still some differences in getting a MMJ card from state-to-state, however, some major, some minor. Generally, the main difference is in what condition/s qualify a patient for medical marijuana – some states are more restrictive than others. California is perhaps the most liberal with regards to the medical ailments can qualify one for a medical marijuana card.

Other differences include possession amounts, whether or not they allow cultivation, and the amount of taxes each state leverages.

We are going to give you as comprehensive a guide of everything you need to know to get your medical card and your medicine legally in every state in 2018 in as simple and straightforward way as possible.

There are two ways of getting your recommendation letter: online, from the comfort of your own home or when on the move, or by visiting a physician in-person. Should you reside in California, for most people, the easiest way to get your doctor’s recommendation letter is online. You will be seen by a licensed physician and can be approved for a medical card in minutes.

You do not need to have permission from your primary physician to get a medical marijuana recommendation and card. However, this may change soon, so keep an eye out!

The process is 100% confidential, secure and convenient.. It takes 10 minutes (sometimes quicker) and is completed in three simple steps.

Step 1: CLICK HERE and Register online.

This takes 2 minutes and you’ll be asked a couple of questions about how you’re hoping cannabis can help you and your medical history. The process is 100% confidential and HIPAA compliant. .

Step 2: Be seen by a physician in minutes.

You’ll enter the virtual waiting room and be seen by a physician. Make sure your microphone and camera are working on your phone or laptop so the doctor can see and hear you.

Step 3: Qualify and receive your medical marijuana recommendation in your email inbox immediately.

Many dispensaries accept this and you’ll be able to go into a dispensary right away but you’ll also receive a hard copy of your recommendation and your card will be sent to your address in 2 – 3 days. This is the simplest, fastest and most convenient way to get you recommendation letter and Doctor Frank makes it as easy as 1,2, 3. Patients can avoid long waiting hours at the doctors and be seen in a couple of clicks.

If you want to know how to get a medical marijuana card in just a few minutes, as well as how simple it is, check out this video …

For most medical states, you will need to see a doctor in person and prior to that, make an appointment with your primary care physician to obtain your medical records and documentation describing why you need medical marijuana. Regardless of the state, though, it is best to have a primary care physician who understands you’re willing to use medical marijuana.

Qualifying conditions, costs and minimum age for qualification vary (and we’ve outlined these in each individual state), but the process is often generally similar from state-to-state. You will usually have to do the following to get a medical marijuana in most US states:

  • Make an appointment with a licensed physician. Physicians must be licensed to practice by the state in order to recommend cannabis for their patients – a doctor from Alaska will not be able to recommend a patient in Florida, for example, unless they are licensed to practice in both states.
  • Bring evidence of the medical condition you suffer from, e.g. medical records, doctors’ letters to your medical marijuana evaluation.
  • You must have state-issued, photographic ID with a unique number (e.g. passport, driver’s license). Out-of-state ID is acceptable if you can prove you are a resident of the state you’re applying in.
  • Bring proof or residence (e.g. mortgage/rental agreement, bank statement, utility bill).
  • You will need a signed, written physician’s recommendation letter in order to access your state’s medical marijuana program. You will then be issued a unique medical marijuana patient number, which can be checked by the state’s database.
  • Upon registration, patients will receive a medical marijuana identity card. This will usually arrive with a hard copy of your recommendation letter, but different states may have different waiting times.
    If you’re applying as a caregiver or on behalf or a minor, you must be over 18 and in some cases over 21.
  • Caregivers must live within the same city or jurisdiction as the patient in most cases.

Note, most states and counties will prohibit cannabis ingestion in public spaces, especially when near parks, schools, government buildings or anywhere there might be large amounts of children.

Driving under the influence (DUI) of cannabis is illegal.

Once you have your recommendation letter, you can usually start visiting medical marijuana dispensaries immediately. However, some will still prefer you have a medical marijuana card as well, so it is worth getting one.

Telehealth/telemedicine makes getting a medical marijuana card so much easier. You needn’t tell your primary care physician in all states, either (although it is recommended to do so for health reasons). There are still some differences, however, some major, some minor. Generally, the main difference is in what condition/s qualify a patient for medical marijuana – some states are more restrictive than others. California is perhaps the most liberal in this regard.

Other differences include possession amounts, whether or not they allow cultivation, and the amount of taxes each state leverages.

Search for your state below to see the laws and the rules for applying for your medical marijuana card. Please remember that laws are prone to changing, sometimes quite quickly and suddenly – and sometimes even to little fanfare! We will keep this page as up-to-date and current as possible. If you see anything wrong or unclear, please don’t hesitate to tell us. In the mean time, read on …

Search for your state below