State Laws

Want to know the differences between the states in the law on medical marijuana? Then you’ve come to the right place!

  • Alaska

    Legal

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    Marijuana is available both medically and recreationally in Alaska. Alaska removed the penalties for the possession, cultivation and use of marijuana by patients who have written documentation from their physician recommending the use of medical marijuana. Patients may possess up to one ounce on their person and cultivate up to six plants, of which only three can be mature.

    Patients must be enrolled on the state-run patient registry in order to argue the “affirmative defense of medical necessity.” Enrolling onto this registry gives patients protection under Senate Bill 94. Caregivers must also be registered in this way. Having a valid medical marijuana card can help protect patients.

    Marijuana in Alaska is legal for both medical and recreational use. However, like many states throughout the US, those who need marijuana for medical purposes can get all sorts of perks and tax breaks for their meds. Here’s a guide to applying for and getting  a Medical Marijuana Card in Alaska …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    Cost

    $25 for new applications. $20 for renewal.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    21 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    5 – 35 days

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    4 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Any disease or treatment that causes one or more of the following: cachexia; chronic or severe pain; severe nausea; seizures (e.g. epilepsy); persistent muscle spasms (e.g. multiple sclerosis).
    • The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services may add other conditions at any other time.

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    Alaska has an interesting history with regards to cannabis. In 1975, Alaska’s Supreme Court established that the right to privacy includes the possession of small amounts of marijuana. In 1982, Alaska decriminalized possession of small amounts of cannabis, before recriminalizing it in 1990.

    Alaska’s chequered history with cannabis ought to indicate to others that it is a state that seems to have been traditionally sympathetic to cannabis legalization/decriminalization. Therefore, it should perhaps not be a surprise that Alaska adopted medical and recreational marijuana a bit sooner than many other states.

    1998 – Ballot Measure 8 is approved, allowing those with a valid recommendation letter signed by a physician to legally possess, use and cultivate cannabis for personal medical use.

    1999 – Senate Bill 94 is amended. This means that medical marijuana patients and their caregivers must enroll in the state’s registry and possess a valid medical marijuana card. Registry is confidential.

    Patient possession limits in Alaska are the same for medical and recreational users alike – up to one ounce on their persons whilst in public.

    A recreational user may Possess up to 4 ounces of marijuana in their residence.

    Both medical and recreational users may cultivate up to 6 plants in their own residence, with a maximum of three mature plants.

    Due to right-to-privacy laws, a person may be able to grow up to 25 plants in their own residence. Those who live within 500 feet of a school or recreation center may be able to use right-to-privacy laws if they are using cannabis within their own residence and are taking precautions with regard to their growing sites and where they use cannabis (i.e. keep it out of public view!).

    However, even though there are right-to-privacy laws on the state level, federal charges may still be brought against those who are unlucky enough to be targeted as such. Therefore, it is recommended that those wanting to cultivate keep it relatively under wraps.

    Distribution and sales without license is strictly prohibited. However, a person may convey less than an ounce of cannabis to anyone aged 21 or over without remuneration.

    You must be aged 21 or over to apply for a medical marijuana card for yourself in Alaska. Caregivers must also be aged 21 or over in order to apply.

    Those who fill out an application form for a medical marijuana card must ensure they get it right – mistakes can lead to a denial of application, and you cannot apply again for 6 months after the decision’s been made.

    There is no reciprocity in Alaska, meaning medical marijuana cards from other states are not seen as valid.

    Caregivers can only look after one patient at a time, unless they are simultaneously looking after other patients related to them via blood or marriage.

    Hash and concentrates must be made using non-solvent methods. This means that the laws surrounding hash and concentrates in Alaska is still a little uncertain in some regards, and possession may be charged as a misdemeanor, with some incarceration time and/or a fine.

    Assets like vehicles or other property may be seized in a civil proceeding.

    Consuming cannabis in public is considered a violation, and can bring a fine of up to $100.

    Cannabis is a Schedule VIA substance under the Alaska Controlled Substances Act. Concentrates, however, are Schedule IIIA substances.

  • Arizona

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Arizona allows for the medical use of marijuana. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well. Arizona also has some reciprocity with California’s Medical Marijuana Program (MMP).

    The laws in Arizona are constantly changing, so it is best an eye is kept on it. Being accepted for a card and becoming registered affords the patient protection under the Arizona Medical Marijuana Law. Though a little more strict in some ways, applying for an Arizona Medical Marijuana Card is quite similar to how one would apply for one in other states.

    arizona marijuana laws

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    Cost

    $150 for new applicants. $75 for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 14 days.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Hepatitis C
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
    • Severe and chronic pain
    • Seizures, such as those arising from epilepsy
    • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, such as those caused by multiple sclerosis (MS)
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2010 – Ballot Proposition 203 “The Arizona Medical Marijuana Act” is approved. This means that a patient with a written or oral recommendation by a physician could use, cultivate and possess cannabis.

    2012 – the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) released the revised rules for regulating medical marijuana. Arizona’s first medical marijuana dispensary, ‘Arizona Organic’ also opens up.

    2013 – Governor Jan Brewer signs Senate Bill 1443.

    Medical marijuana patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana.

    Home cultivation is only allowed if patient lives more than 25 miles away from the nearest dispensary. A maximum of 12 plants may be grown, if they are cultivated in an enclosed, locked facility.

    Dispensaries operate on a “not-for-profit” basis. Profiting from cannabis sales may be used as evidence of a federal crime!

    Arizona has a Caregiver program.

    Arizona does have reciprocity with other medical marijuana states. Patient must have a valid medical marijuana card and recommendation. Patient must not be a resident of Arizona, or have been in Arizona for less than 30 days.

    Non-medical use of marijuana is a punishable offence in Arizona. Possession of anything less than 2 pounds of cannabis is a felony punishable by 4 months – 2 years’ incarceration and/or a maximum fine of up to $150,000.

     

  • Arkansas

    Medical use only

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    Arkansas’ medical marijuana industry will ramp up in the this week (06/26), with the state ready to accept applications from potential patients, growers and distributors on Friday 06/30.

    Beginning Friday, the state Medical Marijuana Commission will accept applications from those hoping to grow or supply marijuana, while the Health Department will take applications from those hoping to benefit from the first marijuana-as-medicine program in the Bible Belt. The application periods will run until Sept. 18. Registered patients can possess up to 2.5 ounces over a 14-day period. No rules on personal cultivation have been reached yet.

    Arizona accepts other states’ registry ID cards.

    Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Arkansas …

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    In-person only.

    Cost

    $50

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 30 days

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Arthritis (severe)
    • Cancer
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Fibromyalgia
    • Glaucoma
    • Hepatitis C
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Tourette’s syndrome
    • Ulcerative colitis
    • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
    • Peripheral neuropathy
    • Intractable pain that doesn’t respond to any other treatment
    • Severe nausea
    • Conditions that cause seizures, e.g. epilepsy
    • Conditions that cause severe or persistent muscle spasms, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS)

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2016 – Medical marijuana is legalized, allowing patients to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis on their person over a 14 day period.

    2017 – Applications for medical marijuana registration are being accepted.

    Applicants for a medical marijuana card must be aged 18 or over if they are applying for themselves.

    Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

    Patients must be aged 18 or older to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves. However, anyone aged under 21 cannot consume herbal forms of cannabis. Using herbal cannabis is not permitted in front of pregnant women or a child aged 14 or under.

    Dispensaries cannot provide cannabis-infused food or drink items that measure above 10 mg of THC.

    Home cultivation is not permitted.

    Dispensaries are not operational as of yet. Regulators will license up to 32 dispensaries (maximum 40) and up to 5 marijuana cultivators (maximum 8).

    For those without a valid medical marijuana card, possession of less than 4 ounces is a crime, and may bring with it incarceration for up to 1 year and/or a fine of $2,500 for a first offence. Subsequent offences will bring significantly more incarceration time and/or a higher fine. Penalties for hash and concentrates are the same as they are for marijuana flower.

  • California

    Legal

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    California has quite a complex system regarding rules and regulations. At the moment, California’s Medical Marijuana Programme (MMP) cannot provide information on acquiring marijuana. The MMP also has no jurisdiction over medical marijuana cooperatives, dispensaries or collectives. Essentially, different jurisdictions in California have different rules.

    Patients must have a valid recommendation letter from a physician in order to buy from a medical marijuana dispensary. Registering onto the MMP and getting a MMJ card is voluntary, but highly recommended, as it makes life easier for patients! Patients must be at least 18 years of age in order to apply for a medical marijuana card. Those younger than 18 may be able to get a hold of medical marijuana via their parents regiatering as caregivers.

    Medical marijuana patients can possess up to eight ounces of marijuana on their person. They can grow up to 99 plants with the appropriate grower’s license. Patients may be able to cite a defense of medical necessity in court if they have an appropriate license and growing more than 6 mature or 12 immature plants.

    If you’re looking to get yourself a recommendation and California Medical Marijuana Card (MMC), get in contact with Dr. Frank as soon as possible. You may book an appointment over the phone, online or in-person. We can do check-ups online, too. You do not need to have a prior relationship with a doctor in order to get a recommendation – this can be done away from your primary doctor.

    Those who qualify for a medical marijuana card are exempt from the sales tax and, due to some oversights on the regulations surrounding Prop. 64, may well be exempt from any tax on medical marijuana until January 1st 2018.

    Here’s how to get a hold of a Medical Marijuana Card in California …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. Doctor Frank and the doctors on the Doctor Frank platform are licensed to practice in California (as well as Nevada), and so can recommend qualifying patients with a medical marijuana card. No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in California. However, it is recommended that you have a primary care physician who can corroborate your condition and knows that you use medical marijuana, especially if you are using it to replace other medications.

    Cost

    $49 for recommendation. $59 for recommendation and medical marijuana card. $129 for rec, mmj card and grower’s license (up to 99 plants).

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    2 – 3 days

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    Possession limits are not specified. Technically, a doctor can recommend as much as is needed for a person’s condition. However, it is still best to be careful and not carry too much wherever possible.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Anorexia
    • Anxiety
    • Arthritis
    • Cachexia
    • Cancer
    • Chemotherapy Side-Effects
    • Chronic Pain
    • Depression
    • Fibromyalgia
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Irritable Bowel Diseases (IBDs, such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Coeliac Disease)
    • Glaucoma
    • Migraine
    • Persistent Muscle Spasms and Muscle Cramps arising from Conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS),
    • Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease.
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Radiation Therapy Side-Effects
    • Severe Nausea
    • Seizures and conditions that cause seizures (e.g. Epilepsy)
    • Any chronic or persistent condition/symptom limits the ability for the sufferer to conduct one or more major life activities (e.g. eating, movement).

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in California. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in California before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in California.

    California voters approved Ballot Proposition 215 in 1996.

    Senate Bill 420 (SB420) was amended, imposing statewide guidelines on how much a patient may possess or cultivate in 2004.

    California Attorney General Jerry Brown releases the guidelines for law enforcement and medical marijuana patients, entitled “Guidelines for the Security and Non-division of Marijuana Grown for Medical Use”.

    Attorney General Jerry Brown signs three bills – AB 243, AB 266 and SB 634. These laws clarified the licensing requirements for cultivation, transportation, distribution and so on.

    November 8, 2016 – Proposition 64 is passed and marijuana is legal for recreational use.

    There are technically no possession limits for medical marijuana patients – they are allowed to have “as much as is deemed necessary by their doctor.” Recreational users may carry up to a maximum of 28.5 grams of bud/flower or up to 8 grams of concentrated cannabis.

    Home cultivation is allowed – 6 mature plants and 12 immature plants at any one time. Up to 8 ounces of usable, dried cannabis in one’s own home at any one time. However, those with a Grower’s License may cultivate up to 99 plants at one time.

    Caregivers may have a maximum of five patients under their care.

    California does not have reciprocity with other states, meaning dispensaries do not see out-of-state medical marijuana cards as valid.

    Taxes on cannabis may reach as high as 45% for non-medical users. Medical marijuana users escape sales taxes, but must still pay the excise tax of 15%.

    Once you have your medical marijuana card – which can take between a few days and 30 days to process and issue  – you can start enjoying your city’s and neighborhood’s medical marijuana and extracts.

    And that’s that! As you can see, getting a hold of a Medical Marijuana Card in California needn’t be as as complex as one might think. So call us today and get your medical marijuana card sooner than you think. So book an appointment with Dr. Frank today, and see what we can do to help you. We can take examinations online, too.

    Get a REC letter online

    Apply now
  • Colorado

    Legal

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    Marijuana is legal both medically and recreationally in the state of Colorado, where it is legal to carry up to one ounce (28g) for personal use. People can grow up to six plants for individual use, and a license must be granted for growing for commercial use. Although up to six plants can be cultivated in private, no more than three plants can be mature at any one time.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well. Arizona also has some reciprocity with California’s Medical Marijuana Program (MMP).

    There will be updates and changes to the law from time-to-time (especially in these tumultuous times, what with recreational marijuana becoming legalized in many states throughout the US), so we recommend checking up on Colorado’s laws every now and then. For now, though, here’s the lowdown on how to get a Medical Marijuana Card in Colorado.

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    Cost

    $15

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 35 days

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Cachexia
    • Severe pain
    • Severe nausea
    • Seizures, such as those caused by epilepsy
    • Persistent muscle spasms, such as those caused by multiple sclerosis (MS)

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2000 – Voters approve Ballot Amendment 20, removing state-level penalties on use, possession and cultivation of cannabis by those with a valid recommendation from their physician.

    2010 – Governor Bill Ritter signs House Bill 1284 (HB 1284) and Senate Bill 109 (SB 109). HB 1284 regulates dispensaries, whilst SB 109 ensures that doctors conduct a proper physical examination and that they do not have a DEA flag on their license.

    Recreational marijuana is legal in Colorado. Medical marijuana patients may possess up to 2 ounces, and for those without a valid recommendation and card the possession limit is up to 1 ounce.

    There is no penalty for giving another a person an ounce or less, providing no money changes hands and the people giving and taking the cannabis are aged 21 or over.

    Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or older to apply for themselves. Recreational cannabis users must be aged 21 or over.

    Both medical marijuana patients and recreational cannabis users may grow up to 6 cannabis plants, with no more than 3 mature plants at any one time.

    Possession of 8 ounces or more will be considered possession with the intent to distribute.

    There is no penalty to possess up to 1 ounce of hash or concentrates.

     

  • Connecticut

    Medical use only

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    Connecticut has decriminalized marijuana. However, marijuana is available in Connecticut for medical purposes. This has been the case since 2012, a year after Connecticut decriminalized marijuana in 2011. Qualifying patients may possess a one-month’s supply of cannabis. Governor Dannel Malloy is to thank for this, as he stated:

    “Let me make it clear – we are not legalizing the use of marijuana. In modifying this law, we are recognizing that the punishment should fit the crime, and acknowledging the effects of its application… There is no question that the state’s criminal justice resources could be more effectively utilized for convicting, incarcerating and supervising violent and more serious offenders.”

    Though we here at Doctor Frank agree with Malloy in some parts and disagree with others, we think this is a step in the right direction. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Connecticut

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. Physical meeting not necessary.

    Cost

    $100

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 31 days

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    1 month’s supply of cannabis, to be determined by physician’s recommendations.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) aka Lou Gehrig’s Disease
    • Cachexia
    • Cancer
    • Cerebral Palsy
    • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
    • Crohn’s Disease
    • Cystic Fibrosis
    • Epilepsy
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Intractable Spasticity
    • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury
    • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
    • Parkinson’s Disease
    • Post-surgical back pain
    • Post-Laminectomy Syndrome
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Severe Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis
    • Sickle Cell Disease
    • Terminal Illness requiring End-of-Life Care
    • Ulcerative Colitis
    • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Connecticut. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Connecticut before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Connecticut.

    Governor Dannel P. Malloy signs House Bill 5389 (HB 5389). This bill legally requires a patient to register with the Department of Consumer Protection, protecting them from arrest or prosecution, or being penalized in any manner.

    Instructions for how to register for the program were posted on the Connecticut Medical Marijuana Program in 2012. The draft regulations were posted onto their website in 2013, when applications fully started.

    The first dispensary was opened in 2014. There are currently around 11 dispensaries in Connecticut at the moment, with another due to open.

    Patients may possess up to 1 month’s supply of cannabis, which will be determined by the recommendations the physician makes.

    Home cultivation is not allowed

    Cannabis has been decriminalized to some extent in Connecticut, but recreational marijuana is not legal.

    Connecticut does not have reciprocity with other states, meaning dispensaries and law enforcement do not see out-of-state medical marijuana cards as valid.

    Connecticut has a tax rate of $3.50 per gram if owner possesses 42.5 g or more.

  • Delaware

    Medical use only

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    Delaware’s Medical Marijuana Program is a bit of a minefield. This is because, while cannabis can still be recommended by physicians with a license to practice in Delaware, the state’s program has largely been suspended. Though terminally ill patients can still get a medical marijuana referral, possession of up to an ounce is still punishable by a fine. Carry any more, and the possibility of criminal proceedings and jail time increases.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    There have been changes in the law in recent times, as the law in Delaware surrounding medical marijuana was amended and expanded in order to prevent prosecutions of the sick and to extend the Medical Marijuana Program to terminally ill patients.

    Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Delaware …

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 35 days; usually around 14 days.

    Cost

    $125

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    6 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Decompensated cirrhosis (often a side-effect of Hepatitis C)
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Autism
    • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
    • Severe or debilitating pain
    • Severe nausea
    • Conditions that cause seizures
    • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, such as those caused by multiple sclerosis (MS)
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Terminal illness

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2011 – Senate Bill 17 (SB17) is signed by Governor Jack Markell. Those with written certification by a physician recommending the use of marijuana may use and possess it, providing they stay within state restriction limits. Home cultivation is prohibited.

    2012 – Delaware’s implementation of dispensaries (“compassion centers”) is held back by policy changes at the federal department of justice, much to the disappointment of Governor Markell.

    2013 – Governor Markell sends a letter to Delaware lawmakers stating intentions to relaunch the state’s medical marijuana program.

    2015 – Delaware’s first medical marijuana dispensary opens, near Wilmington.

    2015 – “Rylie’s Law” is implemented. This means minors with intractable epilepsy or dystonia. Minors may not use any smokable form of cannabis, and the preparation they use must be a minimum of 15% CBD and a maximum of 7% THC and/or 15% THCA.

    Delaware has decriminalized cannabis possession to some extent. Any person without a medical marijuana card who’s in possession of under 1 ounce for personal use is issued with a fine of up to $100 for a first offense (a Civil Penalty). Possession of up to 175 grams is considered a Misdemeanor, and may bring a sentence of up to 3 months incarceration and/or a $575 fine. Repeat offenders may get higher sentences and fines.

    As for medical marijuana patients, the possession limit is up to 6 ounces.

    Home cultivation is not allowed.

    There is no caregiver program.

    Recommendations are allowed for those under 18, if the recommendation is made by a pediatric specialist. Pediatric and adolescent patients can only possess oils with a minimum content of 15% CBD and/or 15% THCA. The maximum THC allowance for pediatric and adolescent patients is 7%.

    No reciprocity with other states.

    Applicants must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

  • Florida

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Much to everyone’s surprise, Florida now has a (not-quite-yet-functioning) medical marijuana program (MMP)! Of course, there are some severe restrictions, and it could be argued that Florida has some of the strictest qualifying criteria and medical marijuana laws around. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Florida …

    Parks, Orlando, Florida
    Orlando, Florida

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telemedicine to recommend cannabis is prohibited in Florida. Physician must complete an in-person physical examination.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    30 – 90 days, although people are trying to shorten this long waiting period.

    Cost

    Between $20 and $50. However, Florida patients may need to renew their recommendation every 45 days, meaning costs can be from $160 to $400 annually.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    No limits are specified. However, any cannabis sold in Florida must be at least 10% CBD and a maximum of 0.8% THC, with the exception of terminally ill patients who have a recommendation from their physician stating they may need a higher THC strain or product.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Cancer
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Epilepsy and conditions that cause seizures
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Chronic, nonmalignant pain
    • A terminal condition or illness, with a diagnosis of 12 months or less to live.
    • Any condition severe enough to merit recommendation of medical marijuana by a physician

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2016 – Voters approve of Amendment 2, Florida’s Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative.

    2017 – Patients may start developing a bona-fide relationship with a doctor in order to apply for a medical marijuana card.

    Patients may nominate a caregiver to cultivate their cannabis, although home cultivation is not allowed. This means caregivers will need certification, and will likely be prohibited in terms of how many plants they can grow, the number of patients they can act as caregiver for and whether or not they can use medical marijuana for themselves. Caregivers may be prohibited from using medical marijuana for themselves.

    Up to 5 dispensaries are to be established in Florida. They may deliver to qualified patients.

    Cannabis strains must be at least 10% CBD and a maximum of 0.8% THC. Those with terminal illnesses may obtain strains higher in THC, but must do so from an appropriately-licensed dispensary.

    No more than 5 state-licensed dispensaries to be operational at any one time.

    Possession amounts for patients to be determined by medical need.

    There is no reciprocity with other states.

    Possession or sale without remuneration of 20 grams or less of cannabis without a valid medical marijuana card is a misdemeanor, with incarceration of up to 1 year and/or a $1,000 dollar fine. Repeat offenses may attract higher sentences.

    Possession of any more than 20 grams without a Florida-issued medical marijuana card is a felony and can bring up to 5 years in prison and/or a fine of $5,000.

    Possession of more the 25 pounds brings a mandatory minimum sentence of 3 years, increasing to 7 years for more than 2,000 pounds. Mandatory sentences and fines increase the more cannabis a person has in their possession.

    Physicians wishing to recommend cannabis in Florida must complete a 2-hour course and examination offered by the Florida Medical Association or the Florida Osteopathic Medical Association.

    Conviction causes a driver’s license suspension of 1 year.

  • Guam

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Guam has a medical marijuana program, but there is no state-licensed dispensary opened as of yet. Hopefully, this will change soon. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Guam, as well as some of the laws behind it …

    Naval Base, Guam.
    Naval Base in Guam.

    Telehealth/In-Person

    In-person only. Patient must have a bona-fide relationship with doctor.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years-old. Caregivers must also be 21 years-old. Younger patients may be able to get a medical marijuana card under the advice of a physician.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Around 1 month. Could potentially be longer. Guam legalized medical marijuana in 2014, but a Cannabis Commission has not been properly set up. This means getting a MMJ card might take some time in Guam.

    Cost

    $15. $100 for primary caregivers.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Epilepsy
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
    • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Spinal cord injuries
    • Any conditions that cause intractable spasticity
    • Any patient admitted into hospice care
    • Any condition “for which the qualified patient’s practitioner has determined that the use of medical cannabis may provide relief”

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    Possession of 1 ounce or less is decriminalized in Guam, with no incarceration and a $100 fine. This is for those without a valid medical marijuana card.

    Possession of any more than 1 ounce is considered a Misdemeanor, with a 60-day prison sentence and/or a $500 fine.

    Possession of any amount near a school is up to 1 year in prison and/or a $1,000 fine.

    Distribution of any amount is 10-20 years imprisonment and/or a $50,000 fine.

    A second offense of cannabis distribution is a 15 years-life imprisonment and/or a $100,000 fine.

    Penalties for hashish and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

    Having a person under 18 involved in any marijuana-related crime will add 3 years to the sentence.

    For those with a medical marijuana card, the possession limit is 2.5 ounces.

    Home cultivation is prohibited.

    State-licensed dispensaries are allowed, but none are operational as of yet.

    There is a caregiver program. Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

    Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or over.

  • Hawaii

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Hawaii was one of the first US states to make marijuana legal for medical consumption. Despite this, it is only recently that Hawaii has had its first medical marijuana dispensary approved. On top of this, there are laws against the transportation of cannabis. This means that, for many years, people with Medical Marijuana Cards could use cannabis but either had to grow their own or buy from the black market.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    For the moment, a patient with a valid Hawaiian Medical Marijuana Card can possess up to four ounces. Up to seven mature plants can be cultivated at home. There are no active dispensaries in Hawaii at the moment, as there is no laboratory to test the quality of the product sold by dispensaries (a legal requirement), and all applications to open a dispensary so far have been rejected excepting one: the yet-to-be-set-up Maui Wellness Group.

    However, those who need a Medical Marijuana Card can apply for one, and it is recommended they do so in order to afford themselves at least some protection from the conflict between state and federal law surrounding marijuana’s status in Hawaii. Here’s how to apply for one:

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    14 – 30 days

    Cost

    $35

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    4 ounces. If the patient has a caregiver, 4 ounces is the maximum amount that can be possessed jointly.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Severe autism
    • Chronic and/or severe pain
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS), or any condition that causes severe and persistent muscle spasms
    • Lupus
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
    • Severe nausea
    • Seizures, such as those caused by epilepsy
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2000 – Governor Ben Cayetano signs Senate Bill 862 (SB 862), removing state-level penalties for the use, possession and cultivation of cannabis by those with a signed statement from a physician recommending cannabis for their condition.

    2013 – House Bill 668 (HB 668) is amended, transferring the medical marijuana program from the Department of Public Safety to the Department of Public Health from 2015 onwards. A medical marijuana registry fund is also implemented to pay for the program.

    2015 – Senate Bill 642 (SB 642) is amended, defining the a patient’s “adequate supply” as seven plants or less, regardless of the maturity of the cannabis plant.

    2015 – PTSD is added to the list of debilitating conditions.

    Possession of cannabis by those without a valid Hawaiian medical marijuana card (there’s no reciprocity in Hawaii) is still illegal.

    Possession of under an ounce is considered a misdemeanor, and can bring up to 30 days’ incarceration and/or a $1,000 fine. Possession of up to 1 pound is also a misdemeanor, and can bring the prison sentence up to 1 year incarceration and/or a $2,000 fine, similar to sale of less than one ounce or possession of less than ⅛ of hashish or concentrate.

    Cultivation without a valid MMJ card is a felony, and can bring with it incarceration of up to 5 years and/or a $10,000 fine. Use, possession or sale of paraphernalia brings similar sentences.

    A medical marijuana card in Hawaii is sometimes also referred to as a “329 card”.

    Commercial production will likely bring higher sentences.

    Vehicles and other property may be seized as part of court proceedings.

     

  • Illinois

    Medical use only

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    Illinois’ Medical Marijuana Program is far stricter than in many other states. Patients and primary caregivers cannot cultivate their own cannabis, and a maximum of 2.5 ounces (70g) of usable cannabis can be bought from a intrastate source (i.e. a dispensary) over a period of 14 days.

    The divide between medical and non-medical marijuana users in Illinois is stark. Recreational use and possession can lead to a civil infraction and fine of up to $200 for amounts of 10g, and higher fines and/or prison for larger amounts. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Illinois …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Up to 45 days.

    Cost

    $100 for new patients. $50 for veterans or those enrolled in a federal Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces over a 14-day period.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Hepatitis C
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
    • Muscular dystrophy
    • Fibromyalgia
    • Spinal cord disease (including arachnoiditis)
    • Tarlov cysts
    • Hydromyelia syringomyelia
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Fibrous dysplasia
    • Spinal cord injury
    • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-concussion syndrome
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia
    • Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA)
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Tourette’s syndrome
    • Myoclonus
    • Dystonia
    • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy
    • Complex regional pain syndromes types I and II (CRPS I/CRPS II)
    • Neurofibromatosis
    • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy
    • Sjogren’s syndrome
    • Lupus
    • Interstitial cystitis
    • Myasthenia gravis
    • Hydrocephalus
    • Nail-patella syndrome
    • Residual limb pain
    • Autism
    • Peripheral neuropathy
    • Terminal illness
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2013 – House Bill 1 (HB 1) is approved and signed into law by Governor Pat Quinn, entitled “The Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act”. This established the right for patients and their appointed caregivers to be protected from arrest, prosecution or denial of any right or privilege. Provisions for cultivation centers and dispensaries are also outlined.

    2014 – Department of Public Health released revised rules for the implementation of medical marijuana laws.

    2014 – Governor Quinn signs Senate Bill 2636 (SB 2636), which allows for those aged under 18 to access non-smokable medical cannabis for all the same conditions those aged 18 or over can be recommended cannabis. Epilepsy is added to the list of qualifying conditions.

    2016 – Senate Bill 10 (SB 10) extends the Illinois Pilot Program to 2020.

    Patients with a valid medical marijuana card may possess 2.5 ounces of cannabis per 14-day period.

    Home cultivation is prohibited.

    State-licensed dispensaries are allowed, but none are operational as of yet.

    Caregivers must be aged 18 or over, and may only serve one patient who is too sick to pick up their medication, and is homebound.

    Cannabis is decriminalized in Illinois. Possession of 10 grams or less is a Civil Violation, and can bring with it a fine of up to $200. Possession of any more than 10 g and less than 30 is considered a misdemeanor and can bring with it prison time of up to one year and/or a $1,000 fine. Subsequent offenses bring a mandatory minimum sentence of at least one year, increasing if the possession amount is greater than 10 grams.

    Sale or trafficking of less than 2.5 g of cannabis is a misdemeanor and can bring an incarceration period of 6 months and/or a fine of $1,500. Cultivation of 5 plants or less brings similar penalties, as does sale or distribution of paraphernalia.

    Penalties for hash and concentrates are similar to those of dried cannabis flower.

    Civil asset forfeiture is a possibility when charged.

  • Maine

    Legal

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    Maine has recently voted to make cannabis legal for recreational use, although medical use has been allowed in Maine for quite some time. Maine also has some of the more forgiving laws and regulations surrounding marijuana in comparison to other states, especially for those from states other than Maine.

    For the moment, it is legal for a person to carry up to just slightly over 2.5 ounces (71g, to be precise) on their person. Up to 6 plants can be grown for an individual. Caregivers can provide service for up to 5 people, so 6 plants each (a total of 30 plants). Commercial growers will need a special license.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. The state of Maine offers medical marijuana card (MMC) recommendations online via telehealth. You do not need to have a prior relationship to a physician in order to qualify for a MMC. We here at Doctor Frank’s should be able to help you with a recommendation for Maine, so get onto telehealth and see if you qualify!

    For those who need cannabis or any of its extracts for medicinal purposes, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Maine …

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. Patient does not have to see physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    3 – 21 days

    Cost

    Medical marijuana cards do not have an application fee in Maine, although you will still have to pay a fee for the doctor’s time!

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Glaucoma
    • Hepatitis C
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
    • Nail-patella syndrome
    • Irritable Bowel Diseases (IBDs)
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
    • Severe nausea
    • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, e.g. those arising from conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) or
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Epilepsy
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Maine. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Maine before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Maine.

    1999 – Maine voters approve Ballot Question 2, which removed state-level criminal penalties for the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients with medical need and oral or written medical opinion stating that the patient may benefit from the medical use of marijuana.

    2002 – Senate Bill 611 (SB 611) is introduced, increasing the amount of useable cannabis a patient is allowed to carry to up to 2.5 ounces.

    2009 – Voters approve of Question 9, which included a wider number of conditions cannabis can be recommended for.

    2013 – LD 1062 is introduced, adding PTSD to the list of conditions cannabis can be recommended for.

    There are a maximum of 8 state-licensed dispensaries that are allowed to be operational in Maine at any one time.

    Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

    Maine has reciprocity and does recognize out-of-state medical marijuana cards. Visiting patients are not, however, allowed to purchase cannabis at a medical marijuana dispensary.

    Maine has legalized marijuana, with a possession limit of up to 2.5 oz. of cannabis or 5 g of concentrate.

    Cultivation of up to 6 plants is allowed.

    Tax rates are expected to reach about 20% per gram for recreational users. Medical marijuana users will likely save on some sales taxes.

  • Maryland

    Medical use only

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    Maryland has allowed marijuana for medical use, but there are stiff penalties for recreational use, even if marijuana is decriminalized (usually used to fine marijuana users and put them into drug treatment). Like a few other states where medical marijuana is legal for those with a valid card and permission, Maryland has no dispensary as of yet.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    For those who are in need of relief from what could be chronic and debilitating conditions, here’s a guide to getting hold of a Medical Marijuana Card in Maryland:

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    Cost

    $50

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 30 days, although there may be some backlogs and some have complained of it taking much longer.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    30-day supply, to be determined by physician’s recommendation.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Hepatitis C
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Any condition where medical marijuana may be helpful, as determined by a physician

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2014 – House Bill 881 (HB 881) is approved by Governor Martin O’Malley. This tasked the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission with developing regulations for patients and dispensaries, including licensing, fees and possession limits.

    2016 – The Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission is allowed to issue the number of dispensary licenses available.

    2017 – Doctors and nurses may make a medical marijuana recommendation as long as they are licensed by the Maryland Board of Nursing, Maryland Board of Physicians, the Podiatrist Medical Examiners or the Maryland Board of Dental Examiners. Registry is mandatory for providers in order to start issuing medical marijuana cards.

    State-licensed dispensaries are operational.

    There is no caregiver program.

    Home cultivation is prohibited.

    Up to a 30-day supply of cannabis can be issued for patients.

    There is no reciprocity with other states.

    Possession of up to 10 g for personal use is a Civil Offense and can bring a fine of up to $100.

    Possession of between 10 g and less than 50 pounds is a misdemeanor, and can bring up to 1 year in prison and/or a $1,000 fine.

    Possession of 50 pounds or more is a felony, with a minimum mandatory sentence of 5 years and/or a fine of $100,000. Intending to distribute more than 50 pounds will get you the label of “drug kingpin”, and can mean a mandatory sentence of at least 5 years and, in cases with multiple offenses (e.g. cultivation) may bring the mandatory minimum up to 20 years and/or a $1,000,000 fine.

    Penalties for hashish and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

    Possession of paraphernalia is a Civil Offense, and though there is no penalty, paraphernalia may be confiscated and a criminal charge may go on record, especially if it’s a repeat offense. Sale/advertising may bring you a misdemeanor charge and a $500 fine. Subsequent violations could mean up to 2 years in prison and/or a $2,000 fine.

    Trafficking more than 45 kg into Maryland can bring up to 25 years in prison and a fine of $50,000. Less than 45 kg and more than 5 kg, and the sentence is 10 years and a $10,000 fine.

    Possession of a firearm with cannabis will bring stiffer penalties.

    Cultivation is treated as possession. However, cultivation may be seen as a sign as wanting to distribute, so this depends on how many plants a person is growing and how much produce they get.

  • Massachusetts

    Legal

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    Massachusetts has recently made marijuana legal for recreational use, and medical marijuana was legalized in 2012. It is currently legal to carry up to 1 ounce (28g) of usable pot outside the home and 10 ounces (280g) inside the home. Patients, caregivers and recreational users can grow up to 6 plants in their own home.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    So, now that marijuana is legal to use recreationally in Massachusetts, why would you want a medical card? Well, if you’re sick or have chronic and persistent pain, then it may well be worth utilising Massachusetts’ Medical Marijuana Program. There are also tax breaks for medical patients, and the cost of medical marijuana will likely be cheaper and more stringently tested for medicinal purposes.

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    Cost

    $50

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Qualify for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 14 days, although some will say to give it up to 30 days.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    10 ounces over a 2 month period.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Hepatitis C
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Parkinson’ disease
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
    • Any other condition serious enough for the physician examining you and for which he/she will recommend medical marijuana

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2012 – Ballot Question 3, “An Act for the Humanitarian Medical Use of Marijuana”  is approved. This means that qualifying patients, physicians, caregivers, healthcare professionals or medical marijuana dispensaries and treatment centers are not punished by the state for using, recommending or distributing marijuana for medical purposes.

    2016 – Recreational marijuana is legalized with the passing of Question 4.

    No more than 35 state-licensed dispensaries are allowed to operate in Massachusetts.

    Caregiver programs exist, but patient must prove that they can either not get to a dispensary (e.g. due to proximity or for health reasons).

    Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

    Patients may possess up to 10 ounces every 2 months. This amount is the maximum allowed in one’s home.

    Outside of the home, possession is limited to one ounce of cannabis bud/flower and 5 g of concentrates.

    There is no reciprocity with other medical marijuana states.

    Home cultivation is allowed – up to 6 plants.

    There is a tax of $3.50 per gram of cannabis if owner possesses 40 g or more.

     

  • Michigan

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Michigan allows for medical marijuana use, and has done so since 2008. However, Michigan has a zero-tolerance rule, and marijuana is listed as a Schedule 1 narcotic. The City of Keego Harbor voted to legalize marijuana for those 21 and older, with a limit of one ounce (28g) being allowed to be carried, and only in non-public places. Basically, if you use marijuana, keep it at home (which is pretty good advice for most states where medical marijuana is legal).

    Despite the fact that Michigan has a zero-tolerance policy, it has more dispensaries than even some states in the US that have slightly more tolerant medical and recreational marijuana laws.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    14 – 30 days

    Cost

    $60

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Hepatitis C
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Nail patella
    • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
    • Severe or chronic pain
    • Severe nausea
    • Seizures, such as those arising from epilepsy
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
    • Any other condition determined by your doctor and those considering your application to be acceptable for
    • medical marijuana use

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    November 2008 – Voters approve of Proposal 1, the “Michigan Medical Marihuana Act”, removing state penalties for the use, possession and cultivation of cannabis by patients in possession of a valid medical marijuana recommendation from their physician.

    2012 – House Bill 4586 (HB 4586) is introduced, amending Michigan’s medical marijuana laws. HB 4586 makes it illegal to transport or possess usable marijuana by car unless it is locked away and in an enclosed case in the trunk of the vehicle, and no marijuana is being used whilst driving.

    2013 – House Bill 4834 (HB 4834) amends the medical marijuana laws again. This time, proof of Michigan residency is needed, as well as a bona-fide relationship with a doctor. This means the doctor must maintain medical records, as well as provide follow-up care. The types of ID accepted are a a Michigan-produced driver’s license, official state ID or valid voter registration. Medical marijuana cards can be valid for up to 2 years in Michigan.

    2013 – Michigan Supreme Court rules that dispensaries are illegal. This ruling means that medical marijuana patients must grow their own cannabis (up to 12 plants, out of public view), or appoint a caregiver, who must be aged 21 or over and can be a caregiver for a maximum of 5 patients. Caregiver must not have been convicted of any violent felony (ever), or a lesser felony for at least 5 years.

    2016 – Dispensaries become legal, but are not operational as of yet.

    Reciprocity is given to other states, if the other state offers reciprocity with Michigan (e.g. a Nevada medical marijuana card).

    Patients must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

    Possession of any amount of cannabis without a valid medical marijuana card is a misdemeanor in Michigan, with up to 1 year incarceration and/or a fine of up to $2,000. Use in a park can bring up to 2 years’ incarceration, and may be considered a misdemeanor or felony.

    Use of marijuana can bring incarceration of up to 90 days and/or a $100 fine.

    Sale without remuneration is also considered a misdemeanor and brings similar penalties as possession. For remuneration, and the incarceration period could be up to 4 years and/or a $20,000 fine. Cultivation of less than 20 plants without a valid MMJ card carries with it a similar sentence. 200 plants or more, and it’s 15 years in prison and/or a $10,000,000 fine. This is a significant jump from the 7 years imprisonment and a $500,000 fine for between 20 and less than 200 plants.

    Penalties for hash and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

    Sale of paraphernalia is considered a misdemeanor, and can bring a 90 day prison sentence and a $5,000 fine.

    Any conviction will result in a driver’s license suspension of up to 6 months.

  • Minnesota

    Medical use only

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    Minnesota law treats marijuana as a controlled substance and recreational marijuana is still illegal. Meaning you there are penalties for possession, use and dealing. Possession of more than 42.5g in Minnesota will land you with a felony, less than 42.5g and you will receive a $200 fine unless you are registered as a patient. While medical marijuana was legalized in Minnesota, this will only be prepared in the form of liquid, pill or vaporized.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Minnesota …

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    14 – 30 days

    Cost

    $200 annually. For those on Social Security disability, Supplemental Security Insurance or who are enrolled onto MinnesotaCare, the fee is $50.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    30-day supply, to be determined by physician’s recommendation. Smokeable preparations prohibited.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer, associated with severe or chronic pain, nausea or severe vomiting, or cachexia or severe wasting syndrome
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Tourette’s syndrome
    • ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) or Lou Gehrig’s Disease
    • Seizures, including those characteristic of Epilepsy
    • Severe and persistent muscle spasms
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Terminal illness with a life expectancy of less than one year.
    • Severe or chronic pain
    • Nausea or severe vomiting
    • Cachexia/severe wasting
    • Intractable pain, effective August 2016.

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2014 – SF 2470 is approved and signed into law by Governor Mark Dayton. State penalties for those using or possessing cannabis are removed.

    2016 – Intractable pain is added to the list of conditions medical marijuana may be recommended for.

    Home cultivation is not allowed.

    Patients may possess a limit of a 30-day supply of non-smokable medical marijuana.

    No more than 8 dispensaries to be operational at any one time.

    Only marijuana in liquid or oil is permitted to be used.

    Minnesota has decriminalized cannabis to an extent, with no charge (and a conditional discharge for a first offense) for those in possession of 42.5 g or less of cannabis. A maximum fine of $200 may be issued. This is the same for giving away up to 42.5 g of cannabis without remuneration.

    Possession or sale of any more than 42.5 g is a felony, and can bring with it up to 5 years’ incarceration and/or a $10,000 fine.

    Those caught with cannabis may also be required to attend a drug education course.

    Penalties for possession of hashish or concentrates is treated equally to marijuana.

    Conviction for possession may result in a 30-day driver’s license ban.

    Cultivation is treated similarly to possession. Remember, though: cultivating may be seen as “possession with intent to distribute”, meaning higher sentences.

    Possession of paraphernalia and sale or advertising of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, and can bring a fine of between $300 and $1,000.

  • Montana

    Medical use only

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    In order to to cultivate, buy or use marijuana in Montana, you must have a registry ID card, or a Medical Marijuana Card, as it’s more commonly referred to. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    In Montana, registered cardholders are limited up to 12 seedlings, although 4 mature flowering plants can be grown in private, and you can carry one ounce of usable marijuana.

    Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Montana …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    Cost

    $75

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 30 days

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    A registered cardholder who has named a provider may possess up to 1 ounce of usable marijuana. If the cardholder has not named a provider may possess up to 4 mature plants, 4 seedlings and the amount of usable marijuana allowed by the department by rule.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • Positive status for human immunodeficiency virus
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
    • Severe chronic pain significantly interferes with daily activities as documented by the patient’s treating physician and by:
      – objective proof of the cause of the pain
      – second opinion from independent Doctor
    • Intractable nausea or vomiting
    • Epilepsy or an intractable seizure disorder
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Painful peripheral neuropathy
    • A central nervous system disorder

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Montana. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Montana before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Montana.

    2004 – Voters approved Initiative 148, removing state-level criminal penalties for those with a medical marijuana card.

    2011 – SB 423 is passed and the application process changed somewhat. SB 423 meant patients required a Montana-specific driver license or state-issued state ID card, as well as a second recommendation by a physician when patients were using cannabis for chronic pain.

    2016 – Initiative 182 is approved, and some of the restrictions on medical marijuana in SB 423 and SB 143 are changed, reinstating the state’s original medical marijuana laws. This means that patients with a debilitating illness and physician’s recommendation are allowed to access marijuana for medicinal purposes.

    A registered cardholder who has named a provider may possess up to one ounce of usable marijuana.

    A registered cardholder who has not named a provider may possess up to 4 mature plants, 4 seedlings and the amount of usable marijuana allowed by the department by rule.

    If there are two or more medical marijuana patients in the same residence, the maximum number of mature plants and seedlings allowed is 8.

    Caregiver programs are operational, but they cannot provide for more than 2 patients (3 if the caregiver is also a patient) at a time, and must be a resident of the state of Montana.

    Dispensaries are operational in Montana.

    Those without a medical marijuana card and in possession of cannabis may well be charged with a misdemeanor or felony, depending on the amount carried. Carrying 60 g or less (1 g or less hashish/concentrates) for a first offence may mean up to 6 months incarceration and/or a $500 fine. A second offence can mean up to 3 years incarceration and/or a $1,000 fine.

    Possession of more than 1 g of hashish/concentrates is considered a felony, and can bring charges of up to 5 years in prison and/or a $1,000 fine. Manufacturing hashish and concentrates can bring a 10 year sentence and/or a $50,000 fine.

    Carrying any amount more than 60 g is considered a felony in Montana, and can carry charges of 5 years or more incarceration and/or a $50,000 fine. Intent to distribute any amount can bring 20 years incarceration and/or a $50,000 fine.

    Sale or delivery of any amount of cannabis – with or without compensation – will bring a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year or more. Selling or distributing within 1,000 feet of school grounds will bring a mandatory minimum sentence of 3 years, and a sale from an adult to a minor a mandatory minimum sentence of 2 years. All sentences may carry a maximum fine of $50,000.

    Those who cultivate more than 1 lb of cannabis face a minimum of 2 years imprisonment and may face life imprisonment. Cultivating less than 1 lb can bring between up to 10 years, but any any subsequent offences may be punishable by twice the imprisonment and twice the fine. Fines of up to $50,000 may be issued regardless of the amount cultivated.

    Possession, manufacture or distribution of paraphernalia is considered a misdemeanor and bring a 6 month incarceration spell and/or a $500 fine. Selling paraphernalia to anyone under 18 can bring heavier sentences and fines.

    Possessing marijuana on a train results in additional fines and/or penalties.

    Storing marijuana results in additional fines and/or penalties.

    Anyone convicted of a misdemeanor must attend a mandatory drug education course.

    Continuing the cultivation and/or use may after being caught the first time may be punishable by double or triple fine and/or imprisonment.

    Felonies may be eligible for suspended/deferred imposition. This means a sentence may be served by including a commitment to drug treatment and rehabilitation, community service and/or driver’s license revocations.

    In Montana, marijuana is considered a Schedule I hallucinogenic substance.

    Doctors who recommend more than 25 patients a year are referred to the board of medical examiners.

  • Nevada

    Legal

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    In Nevada, both recreational and medical marijuana is legal for adults. As a patient suffering a debilitating illness, you will have full protection under Nevada Medical Marijuana Law by applying for a Medical Marijuana Card. Cannabis is now legal in Nevada, and both medical and recreational marijuana users can now get cannabis. Nevada has reciprocity with every single other state in the US with a medical marijuana card, so out-of-state medical marijuana patients can take advantage of the special deals at dispensaries. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Nevada …

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. Patient does not have to see physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    5 – 14 days.

    Cost

    $25 for application and $75 for the medical marijuana card.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces and/or a maximum allowable quantity of edibles or marijuana-infused products, as established by regulation of the Division.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • HIV/AIDS
    • Cancer
    • PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder)
    • Glaucoma
    • Any medical condition or treatment to a medical condition that produces:
    • Cachexia
    • Persistent muscle spasms or seizures
    • Severe nausea or chronic pain

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    Doctor Frank is able to recommend medical marijuana for patients in Nevada.

    2000 – Medical marijuana is legalized via Ballot Question 9. Those with a valid medical marijuana recommendation and written certification by a physician may use, grow and possess cannabis.

    2001 – Assembly Bill 453 creates a state registry of medical marijuana cardholders and those with a recommendation by their physician.

    2013 – Governor Brian Sandoval signs Senate Bill 374 (SB 374), allowing dispensaries to cultivate or dispense marijuana, or to manufacture edibles or marijuana-infused products.

    2013 – Restrictions are also placed on those who grow their own cannabis, being allowed to do so only until 2016. However, those who live 25 miles or more away from a dispensary and/or are growing a strain not provided by their closest dispensary may grow their own, up to 12 plants.

    Patients may have one recognized caregiver. Both patient and caregiver must be aged 18 or older to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

    Medical marijuana patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana on their person.

    Dispensaries are operational.

    Nevada has reciprocity with all other states.

    There is no penalty for possession or gifting of up to 1 ounce of cannabis or 3.5 g (⅛) of concentrate.

    Possession of more than 1 ounce or use in public is considered a misdemeanor and can land a person a $600 fine.

    Cultivation of fewer than 12 plants is allowed. However, those who live near a dispensary may be restricted in the amount and type of cannabis they can grow.

    Sale of more than 1 ounce without a license brings a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year. In fact, breaking any of Nevada’s marijuana laws will bring a mandatory sentence of at least one year, so it’s wise to stay within possession limits!

    Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or older. Recreational users must be aged 21 or over.

    Caregivers must be aged 18 or over. Patients may only have one designated caregiver.

  • New Hampshire

    Medical use only

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    Marijuana is legal for medical use in New Hampshire. As a patient, people are permitted to carry up to two ounces, but patients are not allowed to cultivate at home and there are few state-licensed dispensaries in New Hampshire.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in New Hampshire …

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Up to 30 days, although some have waited longer.

    Cost

    $50

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • ALS
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Cachexia
    • Cancer
    • Chemotherapy induced anorexia
    • Chronic pancreatitis
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Elevated intraocular pressure
    • Epilepsy
    • Glaucoma
    • Hepatitis C (currently receiving antiviral treatment)
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Lupus
    • Moderate to severe vomiting
    • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
    • Muscular Dystrophy
    • Nausea
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Persistent muscle spasms
    • Seizures, including those associated with Epilepsy
    • Severe pain (that has not responded to previously prescribed medication)
    • Spinal cord injury or disease
    • Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
    • Wasting syndrome

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2013 – House Bill 573 (HB 573) is introduced and signed into law by Governor Maggie Hassan. This bill established a registry identification system and the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis Advisory Council.

    2014 – the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHSS) started proposing rules for the regulation of cannabis, and published the “Therapeutic Cannabis Program Registry Rules”.

    2015 – DHSS starts issuing Registry Identification Cards.

    2016 – Dispensaries open.

    2017 – Possession of up to 1 ounce of marijuana for personal use is decriminalized. This is reduced to approximately 21 g, or ¾ of an ounce. Possession of up to 21 g of cannabis for a first or second offense is considered a Civil Violation and brings with it a fine of up to $100.

    Possession of over 21 g is considered a misdemeanor and carries an incarceration period of up to 1 year and/or a fine of $350. Possession of up to 5 g of hash or concentrates is also a Civil Violation. Possession of more than 5 g of hash is a misdemeanor, and manufacturing concentrates or hash is a felony.

    Possession limit for medical marijuana patients is 2 ounces.

    No more than four licensed dispensaries to be operational at any one time.

    No caregiver program.

    Sale or possession with intent to sell is a felony, with up to 3 years in prison and/or a $25,000 fine for any amount less than 1 ounce. 1 oz – 5 lbs, and it goes up to 7 years’ incarceration and/or a $100,000 fine. More than 5 lbs, and it’s up to 20 years’ imprisonment and/or a fine of $300,000.

    Cultivation is held to similar standards as possession or possession with intent to sell.

    Subsequent offenses or offenses taking place within 1000 feet of school grounds and bring stiffer and higher penalties.

  • New Jersey

    Medical use only

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    New Jersey has a Medical Marijuana Program (MMP) that affords patients legal protection under the New Jersey Medical Marijuana law. Like several other states throughout the United States (and unlike several others), patients are not allowed to cultivate their own marijuana. Patients must buy their marijuana from a licensed dispensary. Registration is also mandatory for medical marijuana in New Jersey.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    new jersey marijuana laws

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 30 days

    Cost

    $200. However, those on state assistance programs may be able to get a reduced fee of $20.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2 ounces per month.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Seizure disorders such as epilepsy or skeletal muscular spasticity
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Cancer
    • Severe nausea or vomiting, cachexia, wasting syndromes and so on from chemotherapy or radiotherapy
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
    • Muscular dystrophy
    • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Terminal illnesses where the physician has determined a length of life of 12 months or less

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2010 – Senate Bill 119 (SB 119) is signed into law by Governor Jon Corzine, protecting patients with debilitating illnesses and giving them the right to apply for a medical marijuana card and protect them from arrest and prosecution.

    2010 – Draft rules outlining the application and registration process for medical marijuana are released.

    2011 – Senate Concurrent Resolution 140 (SCR 140) is submitted by Senator Nicholas Scutari, declaring “Board of Medical Examiners proposed medicinal marijuana program rules are inconsistent with legislative intent”. New rules are created to streamline the application and permit process for cultivating and dispensing cannabis, and home delivery is prohibited.

    2012 – Patient registration is opened by by the New Jersey Medical Marijuana Program. The first dispensary opens up.

    2013 – Senator Chris Christie signs Senate Bill 2842 (SB 2482), qualifying use of medical marijuana in edible form for minors with debilitating conditions, upon approval of a physician and a psychiatrist.

    Patient must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for a MMJ card for themselves.

    Possession limits for those with a valid medical marijuana card is 2 ounces per month.

    Home cultivation is prohibited.

    Dispensaries are operational.

    Primary caregiver must be a resident of New Jersey, and have never been convicted of a violent or drug offense. Caregiver must be aged 18 or older, and can only have one qualifying patient at any one time.

    For those without a valid MMJ card, possession of 50 g or less  (or 5 g or less of hash) may get them labelled a “Disorderly Person”, with up to 6 months’ incarceration and/or a $1,000 dollar maximum fine. This is the same with using or possessing paraphernalia. More than 50 g, and it’s a crime, with 1.5 years’ incarceration and a maximum fine of up to $25,000.

    Possession within 1000 feet of a school adds 100 hours community service and a larger fine, in addition to any other penalties.

    Possession with intent to distribute near a school will carry a minimum mandatory sentence of 3 years. Sale to minors or a pregnant woman carries a double term of imprisonment and fine.

    Cultivation has a mandatory minimum imprisonment of 3 years and a maximum fine of $25,000.

    Selling paraphernalia is a crime and can bring up to 18 months in prison and/or a maximum fine of $10,000.

    Being under the influence of marijuana is a misdemeanor.

    Failing to turn marijuana over to an officer is a misdemeanor.

    Driving privileges may be revoked and suspended for between 6 months and 2 years. This is guaranteed if the person caught is under 17.

     

  • New Mexico

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Marijuana is legal to registered patients in New Mexico, but is still illegal for recreational use. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    With a Medical Marijuana Card you can carry up to six ounces of medical cannabis (or more if authorized by your physician) and cultivate up to 16 plants (four mature, 12 immature). Under the law in New Mexico (which is pretty strict without the protection of medical registration) you could be charged with a $50-100 fine and up to 15 days in jail, for possession of one ounce of less.

    Don’t get stuck in a pickle. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in New Mexico …

     

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person. New Mexico has the widest range of telehealth/telemedicine services in the US.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Minimum 30 days.

    Cost

    $30

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    8 ounces over a 90-day period.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Severe chronic pain
    • Painful peripheral neuropathy
    • Intractable nausea/vomiting
    • Severe anorexia/cachexia
    • Hepatitis C infection currently receiving antiviral treatment
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with intractable spasticity
    • Epilepsy
    • Hospice patients
    • Inflammatory autoimmune-mediated arthritis

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2007 – “The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act” is approved, removing state-level penalties for those who need to use marijuana for medical purposes. This established a Patient Registry Program.

    Home cultivation of up to 16 plants (4 mature, 12 immature) may be grown if patient has the appropriate license.

    Qualifying patients may carry up to 8 ounces of cannabis for their own personal use.

    Dispensaries are operational.

    Patients must be aged 18 or over in order to apply and qualify for medical marijuana for themselves.

    There is no reciprocity with other states.

    Those without a medical marijuana card and in possession of 1 ounce or less may get up to 15 days’ incarceration and/or a fine of $100. A second offense could bring up to one year imprisonment and a $1,000 fine (same with possessing between 1 and less than 8 ounces). These are all misdemeanors.

    Possession of 8 ounces or more is a felony, and carries with it up to 1.5 years incarceration and/or a fine of $5,000. This is similar to distribution of 100 pounds or less of cannabis for a first offense.

    Cultivation of any amount without a license is a felony, with 9 years incarceration and a $10,000 fine. Sentence and fine is doubled for any subsequent offenses, or if within a school zone.

    Possession of hash or concentrates is a misdemeanor, and can land one in jail for up to 1 year and a $1,000 fine. Distributing or making hash or concentrates is a felony, with up to 3 years’ imprisonment and a $5,000 fine.

    Possessing or distributing paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $100 fine.

    Driving licenses may be revoked upon conviction for those aged 15 or older.

  • New York

    Medical use only

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    Medical Marijuana is legal in New York, and can be obtained and used safely, without fear of police arrest if you have a Medical Marijuana Card. If you’re coming over from New York and staying in California for work, family, friends or more, and you qualify for medical marijuana card in New York, why not come see Dr. Frank? Book an appointment online today, and you can even take your examination online, too.

    Here is how to get your MMJ card in New York:

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. It is not necessary to see the physician in-person. However, physician must be licensed by the state of New York and be qualified and certified to recommend medical marijuana.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    7 – 15 days

    Cost

    $50

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    A 30-day supply of non-smokeable cannabis. Supply to be determined by the physician.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Amyotrophic
    • Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)
    • Parkinson’s Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis
    • Intractable Spasticity
    • Epilepsy
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
    • Neuropathies
    • Huntington’s Disease
    • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
    • Severe or chronic pain
    • Severe nausea
    • Seizures
    • Severe or persistent muscle spasms

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in New York. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in New York before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in New York. However, in New York, doctors must pass a test and gain a qualification in order to recommend cannabis.

    2014 – Assembly Bill 6357 (AB 6357) was approved and signed into law by the New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. This removed state-level penalties for medical marijuana patients with a signed, written physician’s recommendation letter.

    2015 – Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill enabling an expedited certification process for seriously ill patients.

    2016 – The first 8 (of the expected 20) medical marijuana dispensaries are opened.

    2017 – NY’s medical marijuana program is expanded, allowing for a greater range of products to be sold in dispensaries. New dispensary procedures were also introduced. Patients will be able to walk into a dispensary and speak with a representative about their treatment options.

    In order to qualify for the medical marijuana program in New York, patients must be diagnosed with a severe, debilitating and/or life-threatening condition. Associated or complicating conditions may also be taken into account.

    Patients must have a bonafide relationship with their recommending doctor. However, physical examination is not needed – a relationship can be developed via telehealth.

    Doctors must complete a 2-hour certification course and be in good standing with the state of NY in order to recommend cannabis for patients.

    Only non-smokable forms of cannabis are allowed to be used. This means lotions, lozenges, topicals (ointments, lotions and patches), tinctures, edibles and chewables.

    The maximum possession limit is a 30-day supply.

    Home cultivation is not allowed as of yet, although the new bills signed in 2017 may put a change to this, to some extent at least.

    There is a Caregiver program in New York. Unlike in many other states, a medical marijuana patient in New York may have up to 2 caregivers. Caregivers may have a maximum of 5 patients.

    There is no reciprocity with other states with legalized medical marijuana.

    Recreational marijuana is decriminalized to some extent in New York, but not legalized.

    There is an excise tax of 7% on medical marijuana.

     

  • North Dakota

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    North Dakota has been playing around with the notion of legalizing medical marijuana for several years, before finally doing so in 2016. However, no medical marijuana program (MMP) is operational as of yet, and the right for patients to grow their own cannabis has shamefully been taken away. Anyway, here are the laws and a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in North Dakota …

    Hills and landscape, North Dakota Theodore Roosevelt National Park
    Theofore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. In-person meeting with physician is not required.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Expect 30 – 60 days, as the medical marijuana program needs time to become fully operational.

    Cost

    $50

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    3 ounces of herbal medical cannabis. The maximum amount of concentrate allowed over a 30-day period is 2,000 mg THC.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Cancer
    • Chronic pain
    • Cirrhosis
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Dementia
    • Epilepsy
    • Cachexia/wasting syndrome – North Dakota also states “failure to thrive”
    • Fibromyalgia
    • Glaucoma
    • Hepatitis C
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Nausea
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Spinal Stenosis

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2016 – North Dakota voters approve of Measure 5, known as the “North Dakota Compassion Act”. State Bill 2344 (SB 2344) removes the ability for people to grow their own cannabis.

    Patients may possess up to 3 ounces of herbal cannabis. For concentrates and infused products, the maximum possession limit is 2,000 mg over a 30 day period.

    Patients must have a recommendation to use combustible cannabis. Otherwise, it can only come in the form of edibles, capsules, tinctures, patches or topicals/salves. Edible products are not defined as a “medical cannabinoid product”.

    Up to a maximum of 8 dispensaries are allowed to be operational in North Dakota at any one time. A maximum of two producers.

    No dispensaries are operational as of yet.

    For those without a medical marijuana card, possession of 1 ounce or less is a misdemeanor, and can bring up to 30 days’ incarceration and/or a maximum fine of $1,500. Anything more, and it’s a felony, with a incarceration period of between 5 and 10 years and a maximum fine of $10,000 (for between 1 oz and less than 500 g) or $20,000 for possession of any amount over 500 g.

    Possession of any amount near a school can bring up to 10 years in prison and/or a $20,000 fine.

    Sale of any amount carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 3 years.

    Ingesting hash or concentrates is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year in prison and/or a fine of $3,000. Possessing or manufacturing hashish or concentrates is a felony, with 5 years incarceration and/or a $10,000 fine for possession and 10 years incarceration and/or a $20,000 fine for manufacture.

    Possession, distribution, delivery, advertisement or manufacture of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $3,000 fine.

    Any conviction requires the offender to undergo drug addiction evaluation.

    Juveniles may have their driver’s licenses suspended for up to 6 months.

  • Ohio

    Medical use only

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    Ohio has recently established a Medical Marijuana Program (MMP). So far, the state allows for a maximum of a 90-day supply of medical marijuana, although how much this is precisely is yet to be decided. Registration to the Ohio MMP is mandatory, and patients must possess a valid Medical Marijuana Identification Card (MMIC) in order to take advantage of the state’s MMP.

    Those of you who are from Ohio and looking to visit California ought to book an appointment with Dr. Frank in order to get their medical marijuana card. You can take your appointment online if getting to California from Ohio proves to be too difficult. Of course, if you’re in town, feel free to book an appointment with Dr. Frank in-person, too.

    In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Ohio …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician, whether in-person or via telehealth.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Expect 30 – 60 days, as the medical marijuana program needs time to begin operations.

    Cost

    $50

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    No possession limits specified as of yet. Cannabis products may be dispensed as oils, tinctures, edibles, patches or herbal material.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Alzheimer’s Disease
    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) aka Lou Gehrig’s Disease
    • Cancer
    • Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)
    • Crohn’s Disease
    • Epilepsy
    • Fibromyalgia
    • Glaucoma
    • Hepatitis C
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
    • Chronic or Intractable Pain
    • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
    • Parkinson’s Disease
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Sickle Cell Anemia
    • Spinal Cord Disease or Injury
    • Tourette Syndrome
    • Traumatic Brain Injury
    • Ulcerative Colitis

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2016 – Governor John Kasich signs House Bill 523 (HB 523), allowing for the use of marijuana for medical reasons. HB 523 allows for a patient to carry a 90-day supply of cannabis. Smoking cannabis is not approved, and only oils, patches, herbal material and tinctures are approved methods.

    No possession limits determined as of yet for medical marijuana patients.

    Home cultivation is prohibited.

    Some legal protections for qualifying patients who acquire cannabis from out-of-state sources prior to the operation of state-licensed dispensaries.

    For those without a medical marijuana card and recommendation, cannabis is decriminalized in Ohio to a certain extent. Possession of less than 100 g  (5 g solid hashish or 1 g liquid concentrate) doesn’t bring any charges, is a misdemeanor and has a maximum fine of $150. Possession of more than 100 g is a misdemeanor, but may bring with it up to 30 days’ jail time and/or a $250 fine. Possessing any more than 200 g is a felony.

    Gifting someone cannabis 20 g or less is a misdemeanor with a $150 fine. A second offense may bring 60 days in jail and a $500 fine.

    Selling any amount of cannabis is a felony. Previous convictions of drug offenses bring harsher punishments, as does selling or possessing to a minor or anywhere near school grounds.

    Cultivation is seen as possession, although may be used as evidence of intention to distribute, depending upon how much yield and how many plants the offender has.

    Possession of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor and can bring with it a $150 fine.

    Sale of paraphernalia brings a maximum fine of up to $750.

    Any drug conviction, including possession/sale of paraphernalia, may result in a driving license suspension of between 6 months and 5 years.

     

  • Oregon

    Legal

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    Marijuana is legal both recreational and medicinal use. Oregonians are allowed to grow up to four plants on their property, possess up to eight ounces of usable marijuana in their homes and up to one ounce on their person. However, this cannot be sold or used in public.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well. A specific license must be obtained for growing in your own home.

    Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Oregon …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    Cost

    $200. For those in receipt of food stamps or Oregon Health Plan cards, the fee is reduced to $60. For persons receiving SSI or having served in the armed forces, the fee is reduced to $20.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Up to 30 days.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    24 ounces of usable cannabis.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • Glaucoma
    • Degenerative or pervasive neurological condition
    • Positive status for HIV/AIDS
    • Cachexia
    • Severe pain
    • Severe nausea
    • Seizures including epilepsy
    • Persistent muscle spasms including multiple sclerosis

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    1998 – “The Oregon Medical Marijuana Act” Ballot 67 is approved by voters, removing penalties for the use, possession and cultivation for those in possession of a valid medical marijuana card and signed recommendation letter from a physician.

    1999 – Mandated patients or appointed caregivers cultivating cannabis can only do so in one location.

    2001 – Patient-physician relationship must be bona-fide.

    2006 – Patients carrying above the state legal amount of cannabis can no longer argue for an “affirmative defense” of medical necessity. This means that patients can no longer argue that they’re carrying more than the state limit due to their medical condition.

    2013 & 2014 – Senate Bill 1531 (SB 1531) is signed, restricting the setting up and operation of medical marijuana dispensaries.

    Possession of 1 ounce or less of cannabis is not a state-level crime in Oregon.

    No penalty of 8 ounces or less at home.

    For non-medical patients, possession of over 1 ounce and 2 ounces is a misdemeanor, with a fine of $650.

    Manufacture or cultivation for mass production is a felony, and can bring up to 5 years’ incarceration. Only those with a license can grow cannabis for commercial purposes. Only personal grows in home gardens are OK .

    No fine or penalty for distributing 1 ounce or less of homegrown cannabis for no compensation. More than one ounce and up to 16 ounces, it is considered a Violation and a $2,000 fine.

    There is no penalty for non-medical patients to cultivate up to 4 plants at one time. Any more than 4 and up to 8, and it’s up to 6 months’ incarceration and/or a $2,500 fine. Any amount not grown at home, grown near a school or more than 8 plants is considered a felony and will get you a prison sentences and/or a large fine.

    There is no penalty for solid-, or liquid- infused concentrates at home, as long as the amount extracted is 1 ounce or less.

    Marijuana is considered a Schedule II substance by the Oregon Board of Pharmacy.

    A conviction of a marijuana-related offense can lead to an automatic 6 month driving suspension.

    Commercial drug offenses are punished more severely.

    Those with a medical marijuana card may possess up to 24 ounces of usable cannabis flower at home or on their person.

    Medical marijuana patients may cultivate up to 6 mature plants and 18 immature seedlings.

    State-licensed dispensaries are operational.

    Caregiver program is operational. Caregivers must be aged 18 or over, and a patient may only have one caregiver.

    There is no reciprocity with other states.

  • Pennsylvania

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Pennsylvania has recently made marijuana legal for medical use, removing all state-level penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who have a valid, signed recommendation from their physician stating that marijuana may mitigate his/her debilitating medical symptoms. Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Programme (MMP) will likely come into effect in 2017/2018 and, once established, must register with the state’s Department of Health (DOH) for a Medical Marijuana Card (MMC).

     

    Dr. Frank cannot practice in Pennsylvania. However, out-of-state medical patients visiting California can book an appointment with Dr. Frank and get seen on- or off- line for a medical marijuana card. We recommend doing so as soon as possible if you think medical marijuana will help. You do not need to see your primary care physician in order to get a MMC in Pennsylvania – you can get one via telemedicine without a prior relationship to your primary doctor.

    In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Pennsylvania …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    No real regulations in place as of yet. Legislation is pending in HB 491, and physicians are expected to keep to a standard of practice.

    Cost

    $50

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Expect 30 – 60 days, as the medical marijuana program needs time to get started.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    30-day supply, which is determined by physician. Only cannabis-infused oils, pills, tinctures, topicals and other ointments, tinctures or liquids are allowed.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
    • Parkinson’s Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
    • Spinal Cord Damage/Injury
    • Epilepsy
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBS)
    • Neuropathies
    • Huntington’s Disease
    • Crohn’s Disease
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Intractable Seizures
    • Glaucoma
    • Sickle Cell Anemia
    • Severe Pain
    • Autism
    • Terminally Ill, with 1 Year or Less to Live
    • Ulcerative Colitis

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2016 – Senate Bill 3 (SB 3) is approved and signed into law by Governor Tom Wolf.  State-level penalties for the possession, use and cultivation of cannabis by those with a valid medical marijuana recommendation and card are removed. Patients must register with the Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH). Physicians must complete the Practitioner Registry in order to participate in the medical marijuana program.

    A 30-day supply of cannabis oils, tinctures, topical ointments, pills or liquids are allowed.

    Home cultivation is prohibited.

    Up to 25 growers/producers and 50 dispensaries are allowed to be operational at any one time.

    No state-licensed dispensaries are operating as of yet.

    A caregiver program is in operation. Caregivers must be aged 21 or over. Medical marijuana applicants must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for themselves.

    “If a parent or guardian of a minor under 18 years of age lawfully obtains medical marijuana from another state, territory of the United States or any other country to be administered to the minor.”

    There is likely to be some reciprocity when medical marijuana dispensaries are operational and patients are registered. This is not complete as of yet, and Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana laws haven’t taken effect as of yet.

    For those without a medical marijuana card, possession of 30 g or less (8 g or less of hash) is a misdemeanor that carries a potential incarceration period of  30 days and a max fine of up to $500. Possession of more than 30 g is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $5,000 fine.

    First possession conviction is eligible for conditional release. Subsequent convictions can lead to a double penalty.

    Gifting 30 g or marijuana for no remuneration is treated as possession of 30 g or less.

    Cultivation of any number of plants is a felony, with between 1 and 5 years imprisonment and a $15,000 fine.

    Penalties and fines for possession, sale or distribution of hash are the same as for marijuana.

    Sale or possession of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $2,500 fine.

    Driving privileges may be suspended for the sale, distribution or possession of any controlled substance.

    Courts are advised to push for maximum fines.

  • Puerto Rico

    Felony

    Medical use only

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    Puerto Rico has recently legalized medical marijuana and, although there have been some difficulties in getting the program set up – especially when we look at all the natural and economic disasters that have occurred there over the past couple of years – it seems to be going full-steam ahead. Doctor Frank may also be able to provide medical marijuana cards for patients in Puerto Rico come 2018 – please contact us if this is the case. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a MMJ card in Puerto Rico …

    Puerto Rico; Island of Puerto Rico; Coastline
    View of Puerto Rico

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. In-person meeting is not required.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Up to 30 days, although may take longer.

    Cost

    $50

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    30-day supply, to be determined by physician. Only non-smokeable preparations allowed.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
    • Anorexia
    • Anxiety
    • Cancer or other conditions that cause severe nausea
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Epilepsy
    • Fibromyalgia
    • Hepatitis C
    • HIV/AIDS or other conditions that cause cachexia
    • Migraines
    • Multiple Sclerosis or other conditions that cause severe spasms
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Rheumatoid Arthritis
    • Spinal cord injury or other conditions that cause severe pain

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Puerto Rico. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Puerto Rico before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Puerto Rico.

    Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States, not a state. Puerto Rico recognizes medical marijuana, but it is not easy to register and enter the program. Hopefully, we can make this process a little easier!

    2015 – Governor Ricardo Rosselló Nevares signs the bill allowing for legalized medical marijuana, establishing a legal framework for medical cannabis to be accessible for those with cancer, MS and a number of serious, debilitating conditions.

    Medical cannabis is permitted in Puerto Rico via Executive Order No. OE-2015-35, and is implemented by the Regulations of Puerto Rico Department of Health No. 8766.

    In 2017, the Governor of Puerto Rico signed into law the “Medicinal Act” of Act 42-2017, the “Act to Manage the Study, Development and Research of Cannabis for Innovation, Applicable Norms and Limitations”. This provides legal protection for medical marijuana patients, as well as regulations and oversight for dispensaries and those in the cannabis industry.

    State-licensed dispensaries became operational in 2017.

    There is no Caregiver program in Puerto Rico.

    Home cultivation is not allowed in Puerto Rico.

    30-day supplies of non-smokable preparations are allowed to be sold, unless there is no alternative available to the patient.

    Smoking cannabis is not allowed – vaporizing, however, is.

    Patients may only consume cannabis in a private residence.

    Puerto Rico doesn’t have reciprocity with other states or counties in the US.

    Medical cannabis is subject to a tax rate of 11.5% in Puerto Rico.

  • Rhode Island

    Medical use only

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    Marijuana is legal for medical consumption in Rhode Island, where it is legal to carry 2 and a 1/2 ounces, and to cultivate up to 12 plants and 12 seedlings. There is a laidback stance on cultivation, but the state only has 3 dispensaries.

    For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. Rhode Island allows for medical marijuana card (MMC) recommendations online via telehealth without the need for a prior relationship with a physician. Se up an appointment from Dr. Frank today and see how he can help you – Dr. Frank may be able to recommend you due to Rhode Island’s reciprocity laws.

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. In-person appointment is not needed.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    15 – 30 days

    Cost

    $100. For patients on Medicaid or Supplemental Income (SSI), the fee is $10.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2.5 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer or the treatment of this condition
    • Glaucoma or the treatment of this condition
    • Positive status for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or the treatment of this condition
    • Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or the treatment of this condition
    • Hepatitis C or the treatment of this condition
    • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
    • Severe, debilitating, chronic pain
    • Severe nausea
    • Seizures, including but not limited to those characteristic of epilepsy
    • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, including but not limited to those characteristic of multiple sclerosis or
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Agitation related to Alzheimer’s Disease

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2005 – After much legal wrangling, Senate Bill 0710 (SB 0710) is passed through. It becomes known as the Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act.

    2007 – SB 791 is passed, removing the repeal date for the Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Act and expand the definition of a primary caregiver.

    2009 – H5359 is passed and includes instructions for the sale, creation, administration and regulation of medical marijuana dispensaries.

    2013 – The first compassion center (aka medical marijuana dispensary) is opened.

    Possession limit is up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis for those with a valid medical marijuana recommendation and card.

    Cultivation of up to 12 plants and 12 seedlings is allowed for those with a MMJ card. All plants must be grown in one location, and two or more cardholders may cultivate cannabis cooperatively.

    No more than 48 mature plants, 48 seedlings and 10 ounces of usable marijuana can be grown cooperatively in a non-residential space.

    In a residential space, no more than 24 mature plants, 24 seedlings and 10 ounces of usable marijuana can be grown.

    For those without a medical marijuana card, possession of less than 1 ounce is a Civil Violation with no incarceration and a maximum fine of $150.

    Possession of between 1 ounce and 1 kilogram of cannabis is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $500 fine.

    Possession of any more than 1 kg is considered “with intent to distribute”. This is a felony, and can bring a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years and a fine of $500,000. Anything more than 5 kg of cannabis, and it’s 25 years-to-life for cannabis.

    Cultivating cannabis may bring up to 30 years’ imprisonment and a fine of $100,000, if not more.

    Penalties for hash and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

    Manufacture, sale, delivery or possession of paraphernalia is up to 2 years’ incarceration and a $5,000 fine.

    Possession whilst driving will result in a suspension of up to 6 months.

  • Vermont

    Legal

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    In Vermont, buying recreational marijuana is (at the time of writing) illegal, but using marijuana for medical purposes is legal and anyone who qualifies can apply for a Medical Marijuana Card. Cannabis was decriminalized in Vermont in 2013, when possession of any amount of dried cannabis flower an ounce or under by non-medical patients became a Civil Infarction rather than an offense. There have been various attempts to legalize cannabis in Vermont, and the state came close in 2017 when the House voted to legalize the personal possession, use and cultivation for non-commercial purposes. On January 4, 2018, H.511 was passed and senate passed the voice vote on January 10, 2018. Governor Scott signed the bill on January 22, 1018, and Vermont became the first state to legalize recreational marijuana through the legislature as opposed to referendum. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    15 – 30 days

    Cost

    $50

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    2 ounces

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
    • Severe pain
    • Nausea
    • Seizures including epilepsy

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2004 – Governor James Douglas passes the “Act Relating to Marijuana Use by Persons with Severe Illness”, alongside Senate Bill 76 (SB 76) and House Bill 645 (HB 645). This removed state-level penalties on the use and possession of marijuana for those with debilitating conditions.

    2007 – SB 00007 is passed, amending the law to require a bona-fide patient-physician relationship.

    2011 – SB 17 is passed, providing a framework for the registering of up to 4 medical marijuana dispensaries for the state of Vermont. This is known as “An Act Relating To Registering Four Nonprofit Organizations To Dispense Marijuana For Symptom Relief”.

    2013 – Two medical marijuana dispensaries open.

    Patients may possess up to 2 ounces of marijuana on their persons.

    Home cultivation is allowed. Up to 9 plants may be grown, of which no more than 2 may be mature.

    No more than 5 dispensaries may be operational at any one time. A sixth may be added should patient registry reach above 7000. Dispensaries may deliver to patient’s homes.

    Possession of marijuana is effectively decriminalized in Vermont, with possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana being a Civil Violation penalty with no incarceration and a fine of $200 (first offense), $300 (second offense) and $500 (subsequent offenses). Possession of 5 g or less of hash/concentrate brings the same penalties.

    Possession of more than two ounces is a felony, whilst possession of between 1 and 2 ounces of cannabis is a misdemeanor. Sale of less than ½ an ounce is also a misdemeanor. Marijuana felonies carry a fine of at least $10,000. Misdemeanors, between $500 and $2,000.

    Cultivation of 1-2 cannabis plants is a misdemeanor, with between 6 months and 2 years incarceration and/or a fine of between $500 and $2000. Cultivating more than 2 cannabis plants is a felony, with 3 years’ imprisonment and/or a fine of $10,000 – $500,000 for more than 25 plants (which will also attract a prison sentence of 15 years).

    Possession of paraphernalia by persons aged 21 or over is a Civil Violation, with no incarceration and a $200 fine. Sale of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year incarceration and a $1,000 fine.

     

  • Washington

    Legal

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    Want to get a MMJ card in Washington? Well, now you can! Washington became the first state in the United States to legalize cannabis for recreational use, and Washington’s courts recognized that cannabis could be of medical use since 1979. Washington has been one of the states that has been a cornerstone in the medical marijuana movement. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Washington …

    Banner - Medical Marijuana Card
    Get your medical marijuana card and recommendation with Doctor Frank.

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Mandatory waiting period of around 90 days.

    Cost

    $200, although fees may be reduced for those in receipt of social security.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    If patient is enrolled onto Washington state’s voluntary patient database, then the possession limits are: 3 ounces of usable marijuana; 21 grams of concentrate (e.g. wax, shatter, hashish); 48 ounces of marijuana-infused product in solid form; 216 ounces of marijuana-infused product in liquid form.

    Those not entered onto the system may cultivate up to 4 plants and possess up to 6 ounces of usable marijuana.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Cachexia
    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Epilepsy and conditions that cause seizures
    • Chronic renal failure
    • Glaucoma
    • Intractable pain, unrelieved by other painkillers or treatments
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS) and conditions that cause persistent muscle spasms and/or spasticity
    • Crohn’s disease
    • Hepatitis C
    • Debilitating nausea/vomiting
    • Anorexia
    • Wasting & appetite loss
    • Cramping
    • Chronic renal failure
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    1998 – Ballot Initiative I-692 is approved. Those with valid documentation from a physician may access, use, possess and cultivate marijuana for their illness.

    2007 – Senate Bill 6032 (SB 6032) amends the rules defined by the legislature.

    2008 – The Final Rule is amended, and includes a list of conditions cannabis may be recommended for.

    2010 – State vs. Fry rules that Ballot Initiative I-692 did not legalize marijuana, but provides a qualifying user with an affirmative defense, as long as the user complies with medical marijuana laws.2010 – Chronic renal failure is added to the list of conditions cannabis may be recommended for in Washington.

    2011 – SB 5073 is amended. Governor Christine Gregoire only signs some of the bill’s sections, vetoing voluntary patient registration and the instructions for creating state-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries.

    2012 – Voters approved Initiative 502, allowing the state of Washington to license and regulate the production, sale and distribution of marijuana.

    2015 – SB 5052 passes in both the House and the Senate. SB 5052 is signed by Governor Jay Inslee, with some partial vetoes. PTSD is also added to the list of qualifying conditions. Registration onto the state database is voluntary.

    2016 – The Cannabis Protection Act goes into full effect, affording medical marijuana patients with protection from state-level penalties, clarifying the definition of “medical marijuana use” and tax breaks when purchasing marijuana.

    Those who have registered onto the state registry system may possess up to 3 ounces of usable marijuana, 48 ounces of marijuana-infused products in solid form, 21 grams of concentrate or 216 ounces of marijuana-infused products in liquid form.

    Those who have entered the state registry system may cultivate up to 6 plants for personal medical use, with a possession limit of up to 8 ounces of usable marijuana on their own property (3 ounces possession when on-person). Those not entered onto the system may cultivate up to 4 plants and possess up to 6 ounces of usable marijuana.

    There are no medical marijuana dispensaries. Retail operators may sell medical cannabis.

    Patient must be aged 18 or older in order to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

    There is a caregiver program. Caregivers must be aged 21 or over, and be authorized by the patient’s healthcare professional and/or entered onto an authorized database. Caregiver can only provide cannabis to one patient at a time, to the expressed patient.

    There is no reciprocity with other medical marijuana states.

    For those without a medical marijuana card, private consumption and consumption of 1 ounce or less of cannabis brings no penalties, charges or fines. Using cannabis in public, however, is a Civil Penalty offense and brings a fine of $100.

    Possession of between more than an ounce and 40 g of cannabis is a misdemeanor. Incarceration can last between 24 hours (mandatory minimum sentence) and 90 days, with a $1,000 fine. Advertising paraphernalia brings similar sentences.

    Possession of more than 40 g is a felony, with up to 5 years in prison and/or a $10,000 fine. Intending to distribute any amount without a license brings similar punishment, as does cultivating any amount without a medical marijuana card. This may be added to, as knowingly maintaining a structure used for drug offenses may bring charges of up to 5 years’ imprisonment and/or a $10,000 fine.

    Vehicles and other property may be seized. Juveniles caught with cannabis will have driving privileges revoked.

  • Washington, D.C.

    Legal

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    For many, it must seem ironic that Washington, D.C. – capital of the United States and home of many of central government’s institutions – has legalized marijuana for recreational and medical use for those aged over 21 (or 18 for medical patients). Meanwhile, many states (D.C. is of course a Federal district, not a state) have vastly different laws. Well, “So it goes”, as Vonnegut would write.

    Yet this does not mean that marijuana is not heavily restricted in the District of Columbia. Though it is legal to carry up to two oz. (56g) and grow up to six plants (three mature at a time) for recreational purposes, there are strict laws surrounding marijuana use in public. Furthermore, these restrictions apply even to private clubs, so cannabis is pretty much restricted to home usage, unlike in Colorado, Spain or Holland.

    To add even more to the confusion, though pot is legal to grow and use on private property, there is no way for recreational users to buy from a commercial retailer. Only dispensaries are allowed to sell marijuana, and to buy flowers, edibles, concentrates and more, you need a Medical Marijuana Card to buy from one.

    For anyone from Washington, D.C. who’s looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

    For those suffering from ailments, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Washington, D.C. …

    Telehealth/In-Person

    Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    21 – 31 days

    Cost

    $90

    Qualifying Conditions

    • HIV/AIDS
    • Glaucoma
    • Cancer
    • Multiple Sclerosis
    • Any condition that results in long-lasting, chronic pain or spasms (e.g. Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy)
    • Replacement for opiates post-surgery
    • Patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, the use of protease or azidothymidine inhibitors and several others where side-effects can affect the patient’s quality of life

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    1998 – Initiative 59 is approved by voters, legalizing medical cannabis. The initiative is known as “Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment Initiative of 1998”.

    2014 – Decriminalization and legalization for the use of marijuana by anyone aged 21 or over. However, sales of cannabis for recreational purposes are not permitted, even though it is recreationally and medically legal! Federal property is excluded from these laws, meaning that cannabis is effectively still illegal in many areas of Washington, D.C.

    There are several medical marijuana dispensaries open across Washington, D.C.

    Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or over, whilst recreational users must be aged 21 or over.

    Under Initiative 71, adults aged 21 or over may possess up to 2 ounces of cannabis and cultivate up to 6 plants (3 mature/flowering) on their own property.

    Possession of up to 1 ounce of cannabis by non-medical users is decriminalized, with a fine of up to $25.

  • West Virginia

    Medical use only

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    Medical marijuana became legal in West Virginia in 2017. There is no medical marijuana program (MMP) operational as of yet in West Virginia. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in West Virginia …

    High Point, North Fork Mountain, West Virginia
    http://www.forestwander.com

    Telehealth/In-Person

    No telemedicine policy in place. HB 4463 and SB 320 would permit the practice of telemedicine.

    How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

    18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

    How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

    Expect 30 – 90 days, as West Virginia’s medical marijuana program is yet to begin.

    Cost

    Unknown as of yet. Medical marijuana program is yet to start.

    Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

    Patients may possess up to a 30-day supply, but no specifics are available as to what the 30-day supply constitutes or who can determine the amount a patient needs over 30 days. Medical marijuana patients cannot possess herbal cannabis, and must instead use cannabis-infused oils or liquids that can be vaporized. Topicals, patches or tinctures are also deemed acceptable forms of usage.

    Qualifying Conditions

    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Refractory generalized anxiety disorder (Refractory GAD)
    • Cancer
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Parkinson’s disease
    • Conditions that cause persistent muscle spasms
    • Epileptic seizures
    • Severe nausea and vomiting
    • Anorexia
    • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
    • Any debilitating illness or disease that requires hospice or palliative care, or is terminal

    Medical Marijuana Laws

    2017 – Governor Jim Justice signs Senate Bill 386 (SB 386), legalizing cannabis for medical purposes. The bill was introduced by Senator Richard Ojeda. Medical marijuana cards will be issued as of 2019.

    Patients are permitted to possess a 30-day supply of cannabis-infused products. Patients may not possess herbal cannabis. Only pills, oils, topicals, tinctures or patches. Smoking cannabis is not permitted.

    Home cultivation is prohibited.

    Dispensaries are permitted, but not operational as of yet.

    Caregiver program is available. Patients may have up to 2 caregivers at once. Caregivers may not have more than 5 patients under their care.

    No reciprocity with other states, as of yet.

    For those without a medical marijuana card (unlikely until 2019), possession of any amount of marijuana is considered a misdemeanor, with between 90 days and 6 months incarceration and a maximum fine of up to $1,000.

    Sale or trafficking cannabis in West Virginia is a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year, and up to 5 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of up to $15,000.

    Selling, manufacturing, advertising or distributing paraphernalia carries a minimum mandatory sentence of 6 months and up to 1 year imprisonment. There is a maximum fine of up to $5,000.

    Penalties for hashish and concentrates are the same as those for marijuana.

    Attempting to adulterate a drug screening test is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year incarceration and/or a $10,000 fine.

    Driver’s license may be revoked for any offense when a motor vehicle is in use.

Alaska

Legal

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Marijuana is available both medically and recreationally in Alaska. Alaska removed the penalties for the possession, cultivation and use of marijuana by patients who have written documentation from their physician recommending the use of medical marijuana. Patients may possess up to one ounce on their person and cultivate up to six plants, of which only three can be mature.

Patients must be enrolled on the state-run patient registry in order to argue the “affirmative defense of medical necessity.” Enrolling onto this registry gives patients protection under Senate Bill 94. Caregivers must also be registered in this way. Having a valid medical marijuana card can help protect patients.

Marijuana in Alaska is legal for both medical and recreational use. However, like many states throughout the US, those who need marijuana for medical purposes can get all sorts of perks and tax breaks for their meds. Here’s a guide to applying for and getting  a Medical Marijuana Card in Alaska …

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

Cost

$25 for new applications. $20 for renewal.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

21 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

5 – 35 days

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

4 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Any disease or treatment that causes one or more of the following: cachexia; chronic or severe pain; severe nausea; seizures (e.g. epilepsy); persistent muscle spasms (e.g. multiple sclerosis).
  • The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services may add other conditions at any other time.

Medical Marijuana Laws

Alaska has an interesting history with regards to cannabis. In 1975, Alaska’s Supreme Court established that the right to privacy includes the possession of small amounts of marijuana. In 1982, Alaska decriminalized possession of small amounts of cannabis, before recriminalizing it in 1990.

Alaska’s chequered history with cannabis ought to indicate to others that it is a state that seems to have been traditionally sympathetic to cannabis legalization/decriminalization. Therefore, it should perhaps not be a surprise that Alaska adopted medical and recreational marijuana a bit sooner than many other states.

1998 – Ballot Measure 8 is approved, allowing those with a valid recommendation letter signed by a physician to legally possess, use and cultivate cannabis for personal medical use.

1999 – Senate Bill 94 is amended. This means that medical marijuana patients and their caregivers must enroll in the state’s registry and possess a valid medical marijuana card. Registry is confidential.

Patient possession limits in Alaska are the same for medical and recreational users alike – up to one ounce on their persons whilst in public.

A recreational user may Possess up to 4 ounces of marijuana in their residence.

Both medical and recreational users may cultivate up to 6 plants in their own residence, with a maximum of three mature plants.

Due to right-to-privacy laws, a person may be able to grow up to 25 plants in their own residence. Those who live within 500 feet of a school or recreation center may be able to use right-to-privacy laws if they are using cannabis within their own residence and are taking precautions with regard to their growing sites and where they use cannabis (i.e. keep it out of public view!).

However, even though there are right-to-privacy laws on the state level, federal charges may still be brought against those who are unlucky enough to be targeted as such. Therefore, it is recommended that those wanting to cultivate keep it relatively under wraps.

Distribution and sales without license is strictly prohibited. However, a person may convey less than an ounce of cannabis to anyone aged 21 or over without remuneration.

You must be aged 21 or over to apply for a medical marijuana card for yourself in Alaska. Caregivers must also be aged 21 or over in order to apply.

Those who fill out an application form for a medical marijuana card must ensure they get it right – mistakes can lead to a denial of application, and you cannot apply again for 6 months after the decision’s been made.

There is no reciprocity in Alaska, meaning medical marijuana cards from other states are not seen as valid.

Caregivers can only look after one patient at a time, unless they are simultaneously looking after other patients related to them via blood or marriage.

Hash and concentrates must be made using non-solvent methods. This means that the laws surrounding hash and concentrates in Alaska is still a little uncertain in some regards, and possession may be charged as a misdemeanor, with some incarceration time and/or a fine.

Assets like vehicles or other property may be seized in a civil proceeding.

Consuming cannabis in public is considered a violation, and can bring a fine of up to $100.

Cannabis is a Schedule VIA substance under the Alaska Controlled Substances Act. Concentrates, however, are Schedule IIIA substances.

California

Legal

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California has quite a complex system regarding rules and regulations. At the moment, California’s Medical Marijuana Programme (MMP) cannot provide information on acquiring marijuana. The MMP also has no jurisdiction over medical marijuana cooperatives, dispensaries or collectives. Essentially, different jurisdictions in California have different rules.

Patients must have a valid recommendation letter from a physician in order to buy from a medical marijuana dispensary. Registering onto the MMP and getting a MMJ card is voluntary, but highly recommended, as it makes life easier for patients! Patients must be at least 18 years of age in order to apply for a medical marijuana card. Those younger than 18 may be able to get a hold of medical marijuana via their parents regiatering as caregivers.

Medical marijuana patients can possess up to eight ounces of marijuana on their person. They can grow up to 99 plants with the appropriate grower’s license. Patients may be able to cite a defense of medical necessity in court if they have an appropriate license and growing more than 6 mature or 12 immature plants.

If you’re looking to get yourself a recommendation and California Medical Marijuana Card (MMC), get in contact with Dr. Frank as soon as possible. You may book an appointment over the phone, online or in-person. We can do check-ups online, too. You do not need to have a prior relationship with a doctor in order to get a recommendation – this can be done away from your primary doctor.

Those who qualify for a medical marijuana card are exempt from the sales tax and, due to some oversights on the regulations surrounding Prop. 64, may well be exempt from any tax on medical marijuana until January 1st 2018.

Here’s how to get a hold of a Medical Marijuana Card in California …

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. Doctor Frank and the doctors on the Doctor Frank platform are licensed to practice in California (as well as Nevada), and so can recommend qualifying patients with a medical marijuana card. No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in California. However, it is recommended that you have a primary care physician who can corroborate your condition and knows that you use medical marijuana, especially if you are using it to replace other medications.

Cost

$49 for recommendation. $59 for recommendation and medical marijuana card. $129 for rec, mmj card and grower’s license (up to 99 plants).

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

2 – 3 days

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

Possession limits are not specified. Technically, a doctor can recommend as much as is needed for a person’s condition. However, it is still best to be careful and not carry too much wherever possible.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Anorexia
  • Anxiety
  • Arthritis
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy Side-Effects
  • Chronic Pain
  • Depression
  • Fibromyalgia
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Irritable Bowel Diseases (IBDs, such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Coeliac Disease)
  • Glaucoma
  • Migraine
  • Persistent Muscle Spasms and Muscle Cramps arising from Conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS),
  • Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s Disease.
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Radiation Therapy Side-Effects
  • Severe Nausea
  • Seizures and conditions that cause seizures (e.g. Epilepsy)
  • Any chronic or persistent condition/symptom limits the ability for the sufferer to conduct one or more major life activities (e.g. eating, movement).

Medical Marijuana Laws

No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in California. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in California before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in California.

California voters approved Ballot Proposition 215 in 1996.

Senate Bill 420 (SB420) was amended, imposing statewide guidelines on how much a patient may possess or cultivate in 2004.

California Attorney General Jerry Brown releases the guidelines for law enforcement and medical marijuana patients, entitled “Guidelines for the Security and Non-division of Marijuana Grown for Medical Use”.

Attorney General Jerry Brown signs three bills – AB 243, AB 266 and SB 634. These laws clarified the licensing requirements for cultivation, transportation, distribution and so on.

November 8, 2016 – Proposition 64 is passed and marijuana is legal for recreational use.

There are technically no possession limits for medical marijuana patients – they are allowed to have “as much as is deemed necessary by their doctor.” Recreational users may carry up to a maximum of 28.5 grams of bud/flower or up to 8 grams of concentrated cannabis.

Home cultivation is allowed – 6 mature plants and 12 immature plants at any one time. Up to 8 ounces of usable, dried cannabis in one’s own home at any one time. However, those with a Grower’s License may cultivate up to 99 plants at one time.

Caregivers may have a maximum of five patients under their care.

California does not have reciprocity with other states, meaning dispensaries do not see out-of-state medical marijuana cards as valid.

Taxes on cannabis may reach as high as 45% for non-medical users. Medical marijuana users escape sales taxes, but must still pay the excise tax of 15%.

Once you have your medical marijuana card – which can take between a few days and 30 days to process and issue  – you can start enjoying your city’s and neighborhood’s medical marijuana and extracts.

And that’s that! As you can see, getting a hold of a Medical Marijuana Card in California needn’t be as as complex as one might think. So call us today and get your medical marijuana card sooner than you think. So book an appointment with Dr. Frank today, and see what we can do to help you. We can take examinations online, too.

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Colorado

Legal

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Marijuana is legal both medically and recreationally in the state of Colorado, where it is legal to carry up to one ounce (28g) for personal use. People can grow up to six plants for individual use, and a license must be granted for growing for commercial use. Although up to six plants can be cultivated in private, no more than three plants can be mature at any one time.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well. Arizona also has some reciprocity with California’s Medical Marijuana Program (MMP).

There will be updates and changes to the law from time-to-time (especially in these tumultuous times, what with recreational marijuana becoming legalized in many states throughout the US), so we recommend checking up on Colorado’s laws every now and then. For now, though, here’s the lowdown on how to get a Medical Marijuana Card in Colorado.

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

Cost

$15

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 35 days

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Cachexia
  • Severe pain
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures, such as those caused by epilepsy
  • Persistent muscle spasms, such as those caused by multiple sclerosis (MS)

Medical Marijuana Laws

2000 – Voters approve Ballot Amendment 20, removing state-level penalties on use, possession and cultivation of cannabis by those with a valid recommendation from their physician.

2010 – Governor Bill Ritter signs House Bill 1284 (HB 1284) and Senate Bill 109 (SB 109). HB 1284 regulates dispensaries, whilst SB 109 ensures that doctors conduct a proper physical examination and that they do not have a DEA flag on their license.

Recreational marijuana is legal in Colorado. Medical marijuana patients may possess up to 2 ounces, and for those without a valid recommendation and card the possession limit is up to 1 ounce.

There is no penalty for giving another a person an ounce or less, providing no money changes hands and the people giving and taking the cannabis are aged 21 or over.

Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or older to apply for themselves. Recreational cannabis users must be aged 21 or over.

Both medical marijuana patients and recreational cannabis users may grow up to 6 cannabis plants, with no more than 3 mature plants at any one time.

Possession of 8 ounces or more will be considered possession with the intent to distribute.

There is no penalty to possess up to 1 ounce of hash or concentrates.

 

Maine

Legal

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Maine has recently voted to make cannabis legal for recreational use, although medical use has been allowed in Maine for quite some time. Maine also has some of the more forgiving laws and regulations surrounding marijuana in comparison to other states, especially for those from states other than Maine.

For the moment, it is legal for a person to carry up to just slightly over 2.5 ounces (71g, to be precise) on their person. Up to 6 plants can be grown for an individual. Caregivers can provide service for up to 5 people, so 6 plants each (a total of 30 plants). Commercial growers will need a special license.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. The state of Maine offers medical marijuana card (MMC) recommendations online via telehealth. You do not need to have a prior relationship to a physician in order to qualify for a MMC. We here at Doctor Frank’s should be able to help you with a recommendation for Maine, so get onto telehealth and see if you qualify!

For those who need cannabis or any of its extracts for medicinal purposes, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Maine …

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. Patient does not have to see physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

3 – 21 days

Cost

Medical marijuana cards do not have an application fee in Maine, although you will still have to pay a fee for the doctor’s time!

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Nail-patella syndrome
  • Irritable Bowel Diseases (IBDs)
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • Severe nausea
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, e.g. those arising from conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) or
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Medical Marijuana Laws

No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Maine. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Maine before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Maine.

1999 – Maine voters approve Ballot Question 2, which removed state-level criminal penalties for the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients with medical need and oral or written medical opinion stating that the patient may benefit from the medical use of marijuana.

2002 – Senate Bill 611 (SB 611) is introduced, increasing the amount of useable cannabis a patient is allowed to carry to up to 2.5 ounces.

2009 – Voters approve of Question 9, which included a wider number of conditions cannabis can be recommended for.

2013 – LD 1062 is introduced, adding PTSD to the list of conditions cannabis can be recommended for.

There are a maximum of 8 state-licensed dispensaries that are allowed to be operational in Maine at any one time.

Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

Maine has reciprocity and does recognize out-of-state medical marijuana cards. Visiting patients are not, however, allowed to purchase cannabis at a medical marijuana dispensary.

Maine has legalized marijuana, with a possession limit of up to 2.5 oz. of cannabis or 5 g of concentrate.

Cultivation of up to 6 plants is allowed.

Tax rates are expected to reach about 20% per gram for recreational users. Medical marijuana users will likely save on some sales taxes.

Massachusetts

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Massachusetts has recently made marijuana legal for recreational use, and medical marijuana was legalized in 2012. It is currently legal to carry up to 1 ounce (28g) of usable pot outside the home and 10 ounces (280g) inside the home. Patients, caregivers and recreational users can grow up to 6 plants in their own home.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

So, now that marijuana is legal to use recreationally in Massachusetts, why would you want a medical card? Well, if you’re sick or have chronic and persistent pain, then it may well be worth utilising Massachusetts’ Medical Marijuana Program. There are also tax breaks for medical patients, and the cost of medical marijuana will likely be cheaper and more stringently tested for medicinal purposes.

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

Cost

$50

How Old Do I Have to Be to Qualify for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 14 days, although some will say to give it up to 30 days.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

10 ounces over a 2 month period.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Parkinson’ disease
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Any other condition serious enough for the physician examining you and for which he/she will recommend medical marijuana

Medical Marijuana Laws

2012 – Ballot Question 3, “An Act for the Humanitarian Medical Use of Marijuana”  is approved. This means that qualifying patients, physicians, caregivers, healthcare professionals or medical marijuana dispensaries and treatment centers are not punished by the state for using, recommending or distributing marijuana for medical purposes.

2016 – Recreational marijuana is legalized with the passing of Question 4.

No more than 35 state-licensed dispensaries are allowed to operate in Massachusetts.

Caregiver programs exist, but patient must prove that they can either not get to a dispensary (e.g. due to proximity or for health reasons).

Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

Patients may possess up to 10 ounces every 2 months. This amount is the maximum allowed in one’s home.

Outside of the home, possession is limited to one ounce of cannabis bud/flower and 5 g of concentrates.

There is no reciprocity with other medical marijuana states.

Home cultivation is allowed – up to 6 plants.

There is a tax of $3.50 per gram of cannabis if owner possesses 40 g or more.

 

Nevada

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In Nevada, both recreational and medical marijuana is legal for adults. As a patient suffering a debilitating illness, you will have full protection under Nevada Medical Marijuana Law by applying for a Medical Marijuana Card. Cannabis is now legal in Nevada, and both medical and recreational marijuana users can now get cannabis. Nevada has reciprocity with every single other state in the US with a medical marijuana card, so out-of-state medical marijuana patients can take advantage of the special deals at dispensaries. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Nevada …

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. Patient does not have to see physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

5 – 14 days.

Cost

$25 for application and $75 for the medical marijuana card.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces and/or a maximum allowable quantity of edibles or marijuana-infused products, as established by regulation of the Division.

Qualifying Conditions

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cancer
  • PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder)
  • Glaucoma
  • Any medical condition or treatment to a medical condition that produces:
  • Cachexia
  • Persistent muscle spasms or seizures
  • Severe nausea or chronic pain

Medical Marijuana Laws

Doctor Frank is able to recommend medical marijuana for patients in Nevada.

2000 – Medical marijuana is legalized via Ballot Question 9. Those with a valid medical marijuana recommendation and written certification by a physician may use, grow and possess cannabis.

2001 – Assembly Bill 453 creates a state registry of medical marijuana cardholders and those with a recommendation by their physician.

2013 – Governor Brian Sandoval signs Senate Bill 374 (SB 374), allowing dispensaries to cultivate or dispense marijuana, or to manufacture edibles or marijuana-infused products.

2013 – Restrictions are also placed on those who grow their own cannabis, being allowed to do so only until 2016. However, those who live 25 miles or more away from a dispensary and/or are growing a strain not provided by their closest dispensary may grow their own, up to 12 plants.

Patients may have one recognized caregiver. Both patient and caregiver must be aged 18 or older to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

Medical marijuana patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana on their person.

Dispensaries are operational.

Nevada has reciprocity with all other states.

There is no penalty for possession or gifting of up to 1 ounce of cannabis or 3.5 g (⅛) of concentrate.

Possession of more than 1 ounce or use in public is considered a misdemeanor and can land a person a $600 fine.

Cultivation of fewer than 12 plants is allowed. However, those who live near a dispensary may be restricted in the amount and type of cannabis they can grow.

Sale of more than 1 ounce without a license brings a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year. In fact, breaking any of Nevada’s marijuana laws will bring a mandatory sentence of at least one year, so it’s wise to stay within possession limits!

Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or older. Recreational users must be aged 21 or over.

Caregivers must be aged 18 or over. Patients may only have one designated caregiver.

Oregon

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Marijuana is legal both recreational and medicinal use. Oregonians are allowed to grow up to four plants on their property, possess up to eight ounces of usable marijuana in their homes and up to one ounce on their person. However, this cannot be sold or used in public.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well. A specific license must be obtained for growing in your own home.

Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Oregon …

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

Cost

$200. For those in receipt of food stamps or Oregon Health Plan cards, the fee is reduced to $60. For persons receiving SSI or having served in the armed forces, the fee is reduced to $20.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Up to 30 days.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

24 ounces of usable cannabis.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Degenerative or pervasive neurological condition
  • Positive status for HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia
  • Severe pain
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures including epilepsy
  • Persistent muscle spasms including multiple sclerosis

Medical Marijuana Laws

1998 – “The Oregon Medical Marijuana Act” Ballot 67 is approved by voters, removing penalties for the use, possession and cultivation for those in possession of a valid medical marijuana card and signed recommendation letter from a physician.

1999 – Mandated patients or appointed caregivers cultivating cannabis can only do so in one location.

2001 – Patient-physician relationship must be bona-fide.

2006 – Patients carrying above the state legal amount of cannabis can no longer argue for an “affirmative defense” of medical necessity. This means that patients can no longer argue that they’re carrying more than the state limit due to their medical condition.

2013 & 2014 – Senate Bill 1531 (SB 1531) is signed, restricting the setting up and operation of medical marijuana dispensaries.

Possession of 1 ounce or less of cannabis is not a state-level crime in Oregon.

No penalty of 8 ounces or less at home.

For non-medical patients, possession of over 1 ounce and 2 ounces is a misdemeanor, with a fine of $650.

Manufacture or cultivation for mass production is a felony, and can bring up to 5 years’ incarceration. Only those with a license can grow cannabis for commercial purposes. Only personal grows in home gardens are OK .

No fine or penalty for distributing 1 ounce or less of homegrown cannabis for no compensation. More than one ounce and up to 16 ounces, it is considered a Violation and a $2,000 fine.

There is no penalty for non-medical patients to cultivate up to 4 plants at one time. Any more than 4 and up to 8, and it’s up to 6 months’ incarceration and/or a $2,500 fine. Any amount not grown at home, grown near a school or more than 8 plants is considered a felony and will get you a prison sentences and/or a large fine.

There is no penalty for solid-, or liquid- infused concentrates at home, as long as the amount extracted is 1 ounce or less.

Marijuana is considered a Schedule II substance by the Oregon Board of Pharmacy.

A conviction of a marijuana-related offense can lead to an automatic 6 month driving suspension.

Commercial drug offenses are punished more severely.

Those with a medical marijuana card may possess up to 24 ounces of usable cannabis flower at home or on their person.

Medical marijuana patients may cultivate up to 6 mature plants and 18 immature seedlings.

State-licensed dispensaries are operational.

Caregiver program is operational. Caregivers must be aged 18 or over, and a patient may only have one caregiver.

There is no reciprocity with other states.

Vermont

Legal

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In Vermont, buying recreational marijuana is (at the time of writing) illegal, but using marijuana for medical purposes is legal and anyone who qualifies can apply for a Medical Marijuana Card. Cannabis was decriminalized in Vermont in 2013, when possession of any amount of dried cannabis flower an ounce or under by non-medical patients became a Civil Infarction rather than an offense. There have been various attempts to legalize cannabis in Vermont, and the state came close in 2017 when the House voted to legalize the personal possession, use and cultivation for non-commercial purposes. On January 4, 2018, H.511 was passed and senate passed the voice vote on January 10, 2018. Governor Scott signed the bill on January 22, 1018, and Vermont became the first state to legalize recreational marijuana through the legislature as opposed to referendum. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

15 – 30 days

Cost

$50

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Severe pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures including epilepsy

Medical Marijuana Laws

2004 – Governor James Douglas passes the “Act Relating to Marijuana Use by Persons with Severe Illness”, alongside Senate Bill 76 (SB 76) and House Bill 645 (HB 645). This removed state-level penalties on the use and possession of marijuana for those with debilitating conditions.

2007 – SB 00007 is passed, amending the law to require a bona-fide patient-physician relationship.

2011 – SB 17 is passed, providing a framework for the registering of up to 4 medical marijuana dispensaries for the state of Vermont. This is known as “An Act Relating To Registering Four Nonprofit Organizations To Dispense Marijuana For Symptom Relief”.

2013 – Two medical marijuana dispensaries open.

Patients may possess up to 2 ounces of marijuana on their persons.

Home cultivation is allowed. Up to 9 plants may be grown, of which no more than 2 may be mature.

No more than 5 dispensaries may be operational at any one time. A sixth may be added should patient registry reach above 7000. Dispensaries may deliver to patient’s homes.

Possession of marijuana is effectively decriminalized in Vermont, with possession of 1 ounce or less of marijuana being a Civil Violation penalty with no incarceration and a fine of $200 (first offense), $300 (second offense) and $500 (subsequent offenses). Possession of 5 g or less of hash/concentrate brings the same penalties.

Possession of more than two ounces is a felony, whilst possession of between 1 and 2 ounces of cannabis is a misdemeanor. Sale of less than ½ an ounce is also a misdemeanor. Marijuana felonies carry a fine of at least $10,000. Misdemeanors, between $500 and $2,000.

Cultivation of 1-2 cannabis plants is a misdemeanor, with between 6 months and 2 years incarceration and/or a fine of between $500 and $2000. Cultivating more than 2 cannabis plants is a felony, with 3 years’ imprisonment and/or a fine of $10,000 – $500,000 for more than 25 plants (which will also attract a prison sentence of 15 years).

Possession of paraphernalia by persons aged 21 or over is a Civil Violation, with no incarceration and a $200 fine. Sale of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year incarceration and a $1,000 fine.

 

Washington

Legal

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Want to get a MMJ card in Washington? Well, now you can! Washington became the first state in the United States to legalize cannabis for recreational use, and Washington’s courts recognized that cannabis could be of medical use since 1979. Washington has been one of the states that has been a cornerstone in the medical marijuana movement. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Washington …

Banner - Medical Marijuana Card
Get your medical marijuana card and recommendation with Doctor Frank.

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Mandatory waiting period of around 90 days.

Cost

$200, although fees may be reduced for those in receipt of social security.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

If patient is enrolled onto Washington state’s voluntary patient database, then the possession limits are: 3 ounces of usable marijuana; 21 grams of concentrate (e.g. wax, shatter, hashish); 48 ounces of marijuana-infused product in solid form; 216 ounces of marijuana-infused product in liquid form.

Those not entered onto the system may cultivate up to 4 plants and possess up to 6 ounces of usable marijuana.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Epilepsy and conditions that cause seizures
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Glaucoma
  • Intractable pain, unrelieved by other painkillers or treatments
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) and conditions that cause persistent muscle spasms and/or spasticity
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Hepatitis C
  • Debilitating nausea/vomiting
  • Anorexia
  • Wasting & appetite loss
  • Cramping
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Medical Marijuana Laws

1998 – Ballot Initiative I-692 is approved. Those with valid documentation from a physician may access, use, possess and cultivate marijuana for their illness.

2007 – Senate Bill 6032 (SB 6032) amends the rules defined by the legislature.

2008 – The Final Rule is amended, and includes a list of conditions cannabis may be recommended for.

2010 – State vs. Fry rules that Ballot Initiative I-692 did not legalize marijuana, but provides a qualifying user with an affirmative defense, as long as the user complies with medical marijuana laws.2010 – Chronic renal failure is added to the list of conditions cannabis may be recommended for in Washington.

2011 – SB 5073 is amended. Governor Christine Gregoire only signs some of the bill’s sections, vetoing voluntary patient registration and the instructions for creating state-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries.

2012 – Voters approved Initiative 502, allowing the state of Washington to license and regulate the production, sale and distribution of marijuana.

2015 – SB 5052 passes in both the House and the Senate. SB 5052 is signed by Governor Jay Inslee, with some partial vetoes. PTSD is also added to the list of qualifying conditions. Registration onto the state database is voluntary.

2016 – The Cannabis Protection Act goes into full effect, affording medical marijuana patients with protection from state-level penalties, clarifying the definition of “medical marijuana use” and tax breaks when purchasing marijuana.

Those who have registered onto the state registry system may possess up to 3 ounces of usable marijuana, 48 ounces of marijuana-infused products in solid form, 21 grams of concentrate or 216 ounces of marijuana-infused products in liquid form.

Those who have entered the state registry system may cultivate up to 6 plants for personal medical use, with a possession limit of up to 8 ounces of usable marijuana on their own property (3 ounces possession when on-person). Those not entered onto the system may cultivate up to 4 plants and possess up to 6 ounces of usable marijuana.

There are no medical marijuana dispensaries. Retail operators may sell medical cannabis.

Patient must be aged 18 or older in order to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

There is a caregiver program. Caregivers must be aged 21 or over, and be authorized by the patient’s healthcare professional and/or entered onto an authorized database. Caregiver can only provide cannabis to one patient at a time, to the expressed patient.

There is no reciprocity with other medical marijuana states.

For those without a medical marijuana card, private consumption and consumption of 1 ounce or less of cannabis brings no penalties, charges or fines. Using cannabis in public, however, is a Civil Penalty offense and brings a fine of $100.

Possession of between more than an ounce and 40 g of cannabis is a misdemeanor. Incarceration can last between 24 hours (mandatory minimum sentence) and 90 days, with a $1,000 fine. Advertising paraphernalia brings similar sentences.

Possession of more than 40 g is a felony, with up to 5 years in prison and/or a $10,000 fine. Intending to distribute any amount without a license brings similar punishment, as does cultivating any amount without a medical marijuana card. This may be added to, as knowingly maintaining a structure used for drug offenses may bring charges of up to 5 years’ imprisonment and/or a $10,000 fine.

Vehicles and other property may be seized. Juveniles caught with cannabis will have driving privileges revoked.

Washington, D.C.

Legal

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For many, it must seem ironic that Washington, D.C. – capital of the United States and home of many of central government’s institutions – has legalized marijuana for recreational and medical use for those aged over 21 (or 18 for medical patients). Meanwhile, many states (D.C. is of course a Federal district, not a state) have vastly different laws. Well, “So it goes”, as Vonnegut would write.

Yet this does not mean that marijuana is not heavily restricted in the District of Columbia. Though it is legal to carry up to two oz. (56g) and grow up to six plants (three mature at a time) for recreational purposes, there are strict laws surrounding marijuana use in public. Furthermore, these restrictions apply even to private clubs, so cannabis is pretty much restricted to home usage, unlike in Colorado, Spain or Holland.

To add even more to the confusion, though pot is legal to grow and use on private property, there is no way for recreational users to buy from a commercial retailer. Only dispensaries are allowed to sell marijuana, and to buy flowers, edibles, concentrates and more, you need a Medical Marijuana Card to buy from one.

For anyone from Washington, D.C. who’s looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

For those suffering from ailments, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Washington, D.C. …

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

21 – 31 days

Cost

$90

Qualifying Conditions

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Glaucoma
  • Cancer
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Any condition that results in long-lasting, chronic pain or spasms (e.g. Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy)
  • Replacement for opiates post-surgery
  • Patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, the use of protease or azidothymidine inhibitors and several others where side-effects can affect the patient’s quality of life

Medical Marijuana Laws

1998 – Initiative 59 is approved by voters, legalizing medical cannabis. The initiative is known as “Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment Initiative of 1998”.

2014 – Decriminalization and legalization for the use of marijuana by anyone aged 21 or over. However, sales of cannabis for recreational purposes are not permitted, even though it is recreationally and medically legal! Federal property is excluded from these laws, meaning that cannabis is effectively still illegal in many areas of Washington, D.C.

There are several medical marijuana dispensaries open across Washington, D.C.

Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or over, whilst recreational users must be aged 21 or over.

Under Initiative 71, adults aged 21 or over may possess up to 2 ounces of cannabis and cultivate up to 6 plants (3 mature/flowering) on their own property.

Possession of up to 1 ounce of cannabis by non-medical users is decriminalized, with a fine of up to $25.

Arizona

Felony

Medical use only

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Arizona allows for the medical use of marijuana. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well. Arizona also has some reciprocity with California’s Medical Marijuana Program (MMP).

The laws in Arizona are constantly changing, so it is best an eye is kept on it. Being accepted for a card and becoming registered affords the patient protection under the Arizona Medical Marijuana Law. Though a little more strict in some ways, applying for an Arizona Medical Marijuana Card is quite similar to how one would apply for one in other states.

arizona marijuana laws

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

Cost

$150 for new applicants. $75 for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 14 days.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • Severe and chronic pain
  • Seizures, such as those arising from epilepsy
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, such as those caused by multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Medical Marijuana Laws

2010 – Ballot Proposition 203 “The Arizona Medical Marijuana Act” is approved. This means that a patient with a written or oral recommendation by a physician could use, cultivate and possess cannabis.

2012 – the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) released the revised rules for regulating medical marijuana. Arizona’s first medical marijuana dispensary, ‘Arizona Organic’ also opens up.

2013 – Governor Jan Brewer signs Senate Bill 1443.

Medical marijuana patients may possess up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana.

Home cultivation is only allowed if patient lives more than 25 miles away from the nearest dispensary. A maximum of 12 plants may be grown, if they are cultivated in an enclosed, locked facility.

Dispensaries operate on a “not-for-profit” basis. Profiting from cannabis sales may be used as evidence of a federal crime!

Arizona has a Caregiver program.

Arizona does have reciprocity with other medical marijuana states. Patient must have a valid medical marijuana card and recommendation. Patient must not be a resident of Arizona, or have been in Arizona for less than 30 days.

Non-medical use of marijuana is a punishable offence in Arizona. Possession of anything less than 2 pounds of cannabis is a felony punishable by 4 months – 2 years’ incarceration and/or a maximum fine of up to $150,000.

 

Florida

Felony

Medical use only

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Much to everyone’s surprise, Florida now has a (not-quite-yet-functioning) medical marijuana program (MMP)! Of course, there are some severe restrictions, and it could be argued that Florida has some of the strictest qualifying criteria and medical marijuana laws around. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Florida …

Parks, Orlando, Florida
Orlando, Florida

Telehealth/In-Person

Telemedicine to recommend cannabis is prohibited in Florida. Physician must complete an in-person physical examination.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

30 – 90 days, although people are trying to shorten this long waiting period.

Cost

Between $20 and $50. However, Florida patients may need to renew their recommendation every 45 days, meaning costs can be from $160 to $400 annually.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

No limits are specified. However, any cannabis sold in Florida must be at least 10% CBD and a maximum of 0.8% THC, with the exception of terminally ill patients who have a recommendation from their physician stating they may need a higher THC strain or product.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Epilepsy and conditions that cause seizures
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Chronic, nonmalignant pain
  • A terminal condition or illness, with a diagnosis of 12 months or less to live.
  • Any condition severe enough to merit recommendation of medical marijuana by a physician

Medical Marijuana Laws

2016 – Voters approve of Amendment 2, Florida’s Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative.

2017 – Patients may start developing a bona-fide relationship with a doctor in order to apply for a medical marijuana card.

Patients may nominate a caregiver to cultivate their cannabis, although home cultivation is not allowed. This means caregivers will need certification, and will likely be prohibited in terms of how many plants they can grow, the number of patients they can act as caregiver for and whether or not they can use medical marijuana for themselves. Caregivers may be prohibited from using medical marijuana for themselves.

Up to 5 dispensaries are to be established in Florida. They may deliver to qualified patients.

Cannabis strains must be at least 10% CBD and a maximum of 0.8% THC. Those with terminal illnesses may obtain strains higher in THC, but must do so from an appropriately-licensed dispensary.

No more than 5 state-licensed dispensaries to be operational at any one time.

Possession amounts for patients to be determined by medical need.

There is no reciprocity with other states.

Possession or sale without remuneration of 20 grams or less of cannabis without a valid medical marijuana card is a misdemeanor, with incarceration of up to 1 year and/or a $1,000 dollar fine. Repeat offenses may attract higher sentences.

Possession of any more than 20 grams without a Florida-issued medical marijuana card is a felony and can bring up to 5 years in prison and/or a fine of $5,000.

Possession of more the 25 pounds brings a mandatory minimum sentence of 3 years, increasing to 7 years for more than 2,000 pounds. Mandatory sentences and fines increase the more cannabis a person has in their possession.

Physicians wishing to recommend cannabis in Florida must complete a 2-hour course and examination offered by the Florida Medical Association or the Florida Osteopathic Medical Association.

Conviction causes a driver’s license suspension of 1 year.

Guam

Felony

Medical use only

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Guam has a medical marijuana program, but there is no state-licensed dispensary opened as of yet. Hopefully, this will change soon. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Guam, as well as some of the laws behind it …

Naval Base, Guam.
Naval Base in Guam.

Telehealth/In-Person

In-person only. Patient must have a bona-fide relationship with doctor.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years-old. Caregivers must also be 21 years-old. Younger patients may be able to get a medical marijuana card under the advice of a physician.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Around 1 month. Could potentially be longer. Guam legalized medical marijuana in 2014, but a Cannabis Commission has not been properly set up. This means getting a MMJ card might take some time in Guam.

Cost

$15. $100 for primary caregivers.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Any conditions that cause intractable spasticity
  • Any patient admitted into hospice care
  • Any condition “for which the qualified patient’s practitioner has determined that the use of medical cannabis may provide relief”

Medical Marijuana Laws

Possession of 1 ounce or less is decriminalized in Guam, with no incarceration and a $100 fine. This is for those without a valid medical marijuana card.

Possession of any more than 1 ounce is considered a Misdemeanor, with a 60-day prison sentence and/or a $500 fine.

Possession of any amount near a school is up to 1 year in prison and/or a $1,000 fine.

Distribution of any amount is 10-20 years imprisonment and/or a $50,000 fine.

A second offense of cannabis distribution is a 15 years-life imprisonment and/or a $100,000 fine.

Penalties for hashish and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

Having a person under 18 involved in any marijuana-related crime will add 3 years to the sentence.

For those with a medical marijuana card, the possession limit is 2.5 ounces.

Home cultivation is prohibited.

State-licensed dispensaries are allowed, but none are operational as of yet.

There is a caregiver program. Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

Medical marijuana patients must be aged 18 or over.

Hawaii

Felony

Medical use only

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Hawaii was one of the first US states to make marijuana legal for medical consumption. Despite this, it is only recently that Hawaii has had its first medical marijuana dispensary approved. On top of this, there are laws against the transportation of cannabis. This means that, for many years, people with Medical Marijuana Cards could use cannabis but either had to grow their own or buy from the black market.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

For the moment, a patient with a valid Hawaiian Medical Marijuana Card can possess up to four ounces. Up to seven mature plants can be cultivated at home. There are no active dispensaries in Hawaii at the moment, as there is no laboratory to test the quality of the product sold by dispensaries (a legal requirement), and all applications to open a dispensary so far have been rejected excepting one: the yet-to-be-set-up Maui Wellness Group.

However, those who need a Medical Marijuana Card can apply for one, and it is recommended they do so in order to afford themselves at least some protection from the conflict between state and federal law surrounding marijuana’s status in Hawaii. Here’s how to apply for one:

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

14 – 30 days

Cost

$35

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

4 ounces. If the patient has a caregiver, 4 ounces is the maximum amount that can be possessed jointly.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Severe autism
  • Chronic and/or severe pain
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS), or any condition that causes severe and persistent muscle spasms
  • Lupus
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures, such as those caused by epilepsy
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Medical Marijuana Laws

2000 – Governor Ben Cayetano signs Senate Bill 862 (SB 862), removing state-level penalties for the use, possession and cultivation of cannabis by those with a signed statement from a physician recommending cannabis for their condition.

2013 – House Bill 668 (HB 668) is amended, transferring the medical marijuana program from the Department of Public Safety to the Department of Public Health from 2015 onwards. A medical marijuana registry fund is also implemented to pay for the program.

2015 – Senate Bill 642 (SB 642) is amended, defining the a patient’s “adequate supply” as seven plants or less, regardless of the maturity of the cannabis plant.

2015 – PTSD is added to the list of debilitating conditions.

Possession of cannabis by those without a valid Hawaiian medical marijuana card (there’s no reciprocity in Hawaii) is still illegal.

Possession of under an ounce is considered a misdemeanor, and can bring up to 30 days’ incarceration and/or a $1,000 fine. Possession of up to 1 pound is also a misdemeanor, and can bring the prison sentence up to 1 year incarceration and/or a $2,000 fine, similar to sale of less than one ounce or possession of less than ⅛ of hashish or concentrate.

Cultivation without a valid MMJ card is a felony, and can bring with it incarceration of up to 5 years and/or a $10,000 fine. Use, possession or sale of paraphernalia brings similar sentences.

A medical marijuana card in Hawaii is sometimes also referred to as a “329 card”.

Commercial production will likely bring higher sentences.

Vehicles and other property may be seized as part of court proceedings.

 

Michigan

Felony

Medical use only

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Michigan allows for medical marijuana use, and has done so since 2008. However, Michigan has a zero-tolerance rule, and marijuana is listed as a Schedule 1 narcotic. The City of Keego Harbor voted to legalize marijuana for those 21 and older, with a limit of one ounce (28g) being allowed to be carried, and only in non-public places. Basically, if you use marijuana, keep it at home (which is pretty good advice for most states where medical marijuana is legal).

Despite the fact that Michigan has a zero-tolerance policy, it has more dispensaries than even some states in the US that have slightly more tolerant medical and recreational marijuana laws.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

14 – 30 days

Cost

$60

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Nail patella
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • Severe or chronic pain
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures, such as those arising from epilepsy
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Any other condition determined by your doctor and those considering your application to be acceptable for
  • medical marijuana use

Medical Marijuana Laws

November 2008 – Voters approve of Proposal 1, the “Michigan Medical Marihuana Act”, removing state penalties for the use, possession and cultivation of cannabis by patients in possession of a valid medical marijuana recommendation from their physician.

2012 – House Bill 4586 (HB 4586) is introduced, amending Michigan’s medical marijuana laws. HB 4586 makes it illegal to transport or possess usable marijuana by car unless it is locked away and in an enclosed case in the trunk of the vehicle, and no marijuana is being used whilst driving.

2013 – House Bill 4834 (HB 4834) amends the medical marijuana laws again. This time, proof of Michigan residency is needed, as well as a bona-fide relationship with a doctor. This means the doctor must maintain medical records, as well as provide follow-up care. The types of ID accepted are a a Michigan-produced driver’s license, official state ID or valid voter registration. Medical marijuana cards can be valid for up to 2 years in Michigan.

2013 – Michigan Supreme Court rules that dispensaries are illegal. This ruling means that medical marijuana patients must grow their own cannabis (up to 12 plants, out of public view), or appoint a caregiver, who must be aged 21 or over and can be a caregiver for a maximum of 5 patients. Caregiver must not have been convicted of any violent felony (ever), or a lesser felony for at least 5 years.

2016 – Dispensaries become legal, but are not operational as of yet.

Reciprocity is given to other states, if the other state offers reciprocity with Michigan (e.g. a Nevada medical marijuana card).

Patients must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

Possession of any amount of cannabis without a valid medical marijuana card is a misdemeanor in Michigan, with up to 1 year incarceration and/or a fine of up to $2,000. Use in a park can bring up to 2 years’ incarceration, and may be considered a misdemeanor or felony.

Use of marijuana can bring incarceration of up to 90 days and/or a $100 fine.

Sale without remuneration is also considered a misdemeanor and brings similar penalties as possession. For remuneration, and the incarceration period could be up to 4 years and/or a $20,000 fine. Cultivation of less than 20 plants without a valid MMJ card carries with it a similar sentence. 200 plants or more, and it’s 15 years in prison and/or a $10,000,000 fine. This is a significant jump from the 7 years imprisonment and a $500,000 fine for between 20 and less than 200 plants.

Penalties for hash and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

Sale of paraphernalia is considered a misdemeanor, and can bring a 90 day prison sentence and a $5,000 fine.

Any conviction will result in a driver’s license suspension of up to 6 months.

New Mexico

Felony

Medical use only

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Marijuana is legal to registered patients in New Mexico, but is still illegal for recreational use. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

With a Medical Marijuana Card you can carry up to six ounces of medical cannabis (or more if authorized by your physician) and cultivate up to 16 plants (four mature, 12 immature). Under the law in New Mexico (which is pretty strict without the protection of medical registration) you could be charged with a $50-100 fine and up to 15 days in jail, for possession of one ounce of less.

Don’t get stuck in a pickle. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in New Mexico …

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person. New Mexico has the widest range of telehealth/telemedicine services in the US.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Minimum 30 days.

Cost

$30

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

8 ounces over a 90-day period.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Severe chronic pain
  • Painful peripheral neuropathy
  • Intractable nausea/vomiting
  • Severe anorexia/cachexia
  • Hepatitis C infection currently receiving antiviral treatment
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with intractable spasticity
  • Epilepsy
  • Hospice patients
  • Inflammatory autoimmune-mediated arthritis

Medical Marijuana Laws

2007 – “The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act” is approved, removing state-level penalties for those who need to use marijuana for medical purposes. This established a Patient Registry Program.

Home cultivation of up to 16 plants (4 mature, 12 immature) may be grown if patient has the appropriate license.

Qualifying patients may carry up to 8 ounces of cannabis for their own personal use.

Dispensaries are operational.

Patients must be aged 18 or over in order to apply and qualify for medical marijuana for themselves.

There is no reciprocity with other states.

Those without a medical marijuana card and in possession of 1 ounce or less may get up to 15 days’ incarceration and/or a fine of $100. A second offense could bring up to one year imprisonment and a $1,000 fine (same with possessing between 1 and less than 8 ounces). These are all misdemeanors.

Possession of 8 ounces or more is a felony, and carries with it up to 1.5 years incarceration and/or a fine of $5,000. This is similar to distribution of 100 pounds or less of cannabis for a first offense.

Cultivation of any amount without a license is a felony, with 9 years incarceration and a $10,000 fine. Sentence and fine is doubled for any subsequent offenses, or if within a school zone.

Possession of hash or concentrates is a misdemeanor, and can land one in jail for up to 1 year and a $1,000 fine. Distributing or making hash or concentrates is a felony, with up to 3 years’ imprisonment and a $5,000 fine.

Possessing or distributing paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $100 fine.

Driving licenses may be revoked upon conviction for those aged 15 or older.

North Dakota

Felony

Medical use only

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North Dakota has been playing around with the notion of legalizing medical marijuana for several years, before finally doing so in 2016. However, no medical marijuana program (MMP) is operational as of yet, and the right for patients to grow their own cannabis has shamefully been taken away. Anyway, here are the laws and a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in North Dakota …

Hills and landscape, North Dakota Theodore Roosevelt National Park
Theofore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. In-person meeting with physician is not required.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Expect 30 – 60 days, as the medical marijuana program needs time to become fully operational.

Cost

$50

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

3 ounces of herbal medical cannabis. The maximum amount of concentrate allowed over a 30-day period is 2,000 mg THC.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Cirrhosis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Dementia
  • Epilepsy
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome – North Dakota also states “failure to thrive”
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Nausea
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Spinal Stenosis

Medical Marijuana Laws

2016 – North Dakota voters approve of Measure 5, known as the “North Dakota Compassion Act”. State Bill 2344 (SB 2344) removes the ability for people to grow their own cannabis.

Patients may possess up to 3 ounces of herbal cannabis. For concentrates and infused products, the maximum possession limit is 2,000 mg over a 30 day period.

Patients must have a recommendation to use combustible cannabis. Otherwise, it can only come in the form of edibles, capsules, tinctures, patches or topicals/salves. Edible products are not defined as a “medical cannabinoid product”.

Up to a maximum of 8 dispensaries are allowed to be operational in North Dakota at any one time. A maximum of two producers.

No dispensaries are operational as of yet.

For those without a medical marijuana card, possession of 1 ounce or less is a misdemeanor, and can bring up to 30 days’ incarceration and/or a maximum fine of $1,500. Anything more, and it’s a felony, with a incarceration period of between 5 and 10 years and a maximum fine of $10,000 (for between 1 oz and less than 500 g) or $20,000 for possession of any amount over 500 g.

Possession of any amount near a school can bring up to 10 years in prison and/or a $20,000 fine.

Sale of any amount carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 3 years.

Ingesting hash or concentrates is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year in prison and/or a fine of $3,000. Possessing or manufacturing hashish or concentrates is a felony, with 5 years incarceration and/or a $10,000 fine for possession and 10 years incarceration and/or a $20,000 fine for manufacture.

Possession, distribution, delivery, advertisement or manufacture of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $3,000 fine.

Any conviction requires the offender to undergo drug addiction evaluation.

Juveniles may have their driver’s licenses suspended for up to 6 months.

Pennsylvania

Felony

Medical use only

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Pennsylvania has recently made marijuana legal for medical use, removing all state-level penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who have a valid, signed recommendation from their physician stating that marijuana may mitigate his/her debilitating medical symptoms. Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Programme (MMP) will likely come into effect in 2017/2018 and, once established, must register with the state’s Department of Health (DOH) for a Medical Marijuana Card (MMC).

 

Dr. Frank cannot practice in Pennsylvania. However, out-of-state medical patients visiting California can book an appointment with Dr. Frank and get seen on- or off- line for a medical marijuana card. We recommend doing so as soon as possible if you think medical marijuana will help. You do not need to see your primary care physician in order to get a MMC in Pennsylvania – you can get one via telemedicine without a prior relationship to your primary doctor.

In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Pennsylvania …

Telehealth/In-Person

No real regulations in place as of yet. Legislation is pending in HB 491, and physicians are expected to keep to a standard of practice.

Cost

$50

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Expect 30 – 60 days, as the medical marijuana program needs time to get started.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

30-day supply, which is determined by physician. Only cannabis-infused oils, pills, tinctures, topicals and other ointments, tinctures or liquids are allowed.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Spinal Cord Damage/Injury
  • Epilepsy
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBS)
  • Neuropathies
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Intractable Seizures
  • Glaucoma
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Severe Pain
  • Autism
  • Terminally Ill, with 1 Year or Less to Live
  • Ulcerative Colitis

Medical Marijuana Laws

2016 – Senate Bill 3 (SB 3) is approved and signed into law by Governor Tom Wolf.  State-level penalties for the possession, use and cultivation of cannabis by those with a valid medical marijuana recommendation and card are removed. Patients must register with the Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH). Physicians must complete the Practitioner Registry in order to participate in the medical marijuana program.

A 30-day supply of cannabis oils, tinctures, topical ointments, pills or liquids are allowed.

Home cultivation is prohibited.

Up to 25 growers/producers and 50 dispensaries are allowed to be operational at any one time.

No state-licensed dispensaries are operating as of yet.

A caregiver program is in operation. Caregivers must be aged 21 or over. Medical marijuana applicants must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for themselves.

“If a parent or guardian of a minor under 18 years of age lawfully obtains medical marijuana from another state, territory of the United States or any other country to be administered to the minor.”

There is likely to be some reciprocity when medical marijuana dispensaries are operational and patients are registered. This is not complete as of yet, and Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana laws haven’t taken effect as of yet.

For those without a medical marijuana card, possession of 30 g or less (8 g or less of hash) is a misdemeanor that carries a potential incarceration period of  30 days and a max fine of up to $500. Possession of more than 30 g is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $5,000 fine.

First possession conviction is eligible for conditional release. Subsequent convictions can lead to a double penalty.

Gifting 30 g or marijuana for no remuneration is treated as possession of 30 g or less.

Cultivation of any number of plants is a felony, with between 1 and 5 years imprisonment and a $15,000 fine.

Penalties and fines for possession, sale or distribution of hash are the same as for marijuana.

Sale or possession of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $2,500 fine.

Driving privileges may be suspended for the sale, distribution or possession of any controlled substance.

Courts are advised to push for maximum fines.

Puerto Rico

Felony

Medical use only

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Puerto Rico has recently legalized medical marijuana and, although there have been some difficulties in getting the program set up – especially when we look at all the natural and economic disasters that have occurred there over the past couple of years – it seems to be going full-steam ahead. Doctor Frank may also be able to provide medical marijuana cards for patients in Puerto Rico come 2018 – please contact us if this is the case. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a MMJ card in Puerto Rico …

Puerto Rico; Island of Puerto Rico; Coastline
View of Puerto Rico

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. In-person meeting is not required.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Up to 30 days, although may take longer.

Cost

$50

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

30-day supply, to be determined by physician. Only non-smokeable preparations allowed.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Anorexia
  • Anxiety
  • Cancer or other conditions that cause severe nausea
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS or other conditions that cause cachexia
  • Migraines
  • Multiple Sclerosis or other conditions that cause severe spasms
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Spinal cord injury or other conditions that cause severe pain

Medical Marijuana Laws

No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Puerto Rico. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Puerto Rico before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Puerto Rico.

Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States, not a state. Puerto Rico recognizes medical marijuana, but it is not easy to register and enter the program. Hopefully, we can make this process a little easier!

2015 – Governor Ricardo Rosselló Nevares signs the bill allowing for legalized medical marijuana, establishing a legal framework for medical cannabis to be accessible for those with cancer, MS and a number of serious, debilitating conditions.

Medical cannabis is permitted in Puerto Rico via Executive Order No. OE-2015-35, and is implemented by the Regulations of Puerto Rico Department of Health No. 8766.

In 2017, the Governor of Puerto Rico signed into law the “Medicinal Act” of Act 42-2017, the “Act to Manage the Study, Development and Research of Cannabis for Innovation, Applicable Norms and Limitations”. This provides legal protection for medical marijuana patients, as well as regulations and oversight for dispensaries and those in the cannabis industry.

State-licensed dispensaries became operational in 2017.

There is no Caregiver program in Puerto Rico.

Home cultivation is not allowed in Puerto Rico.

30-day supplies of non-smokable preparations are allowed to be sold, unless there is no alternative available to the patient.

Smoking cannabis is not allowed – vaporizing, however, is.

Patients may only consume cannabis in a private residence.

Puerto Rico doesn’t have reciprocity with other states or counties in the US.

Medical cannabis is subject to a tax rate of 11.5% in Puerto Rico.

Arkansas

Medical use only

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Arkansas’ medical marijuana industry will ramp up in the this week (06/26), with the state ready to accept applications from potential patients, growers and distributors on Friday 06/30.

Beginning Friday, the state Medical Marijuana Commission will accept applications from those hoping to grow or supply marijuana, while the Health Department will take applications from those hoping to benefit from the first marijuana-as-medicine program in the Bible Belt. The application periods will run until Sept. 18. Registered patients can possess up to 2.5 ounces over a 14-day period. No rules on personal cultivation have been reached yet.

Arizona accepts other states’ registry ID cards.

Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Arkansas …

 

Telehealth/In-Person

In-person only.

Cost

$50

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 30 days

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Arthritis (severe)
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Intractable pain that doesn’t respond to any other treatment
  • Severe nausea
  • Conditions that cause seizures, e.g. epilepsy
  • Conditions that cause severe or persistent muscle spasms, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS)

Medical Marijuana Laws

2016 – Medical marijuana is legalized, allowing patients to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis on their person over a 14 day period.

2017 – Applications for medical marijuana registration are being accepted.

Applicants for a medical marijuana card must be aged 18 or over if they are applying for themselves.

Caregivers must be aged 21 or over.

Patients must be aged 18 or older to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves. However, anyone aged under 21 cannot consume herbal forms of cannabis. Using herbal cannabis is not permitted in front of pregnant women or a child aged 14 or under.

Dispensaries cannot provide cannabis-infused food or drink items that measure above 10 mg of THC.

Home cultivation is not permitted.

Dispensaries are not operational as of yet. Regulators will license up to 32 dispensaries (maximum 40) and up to 5 marijuana cultivators (maximum 8).

For those without a valid medical marijuana card, possession of less than 4 ounces is a crime, and may bring with it incarceration for up to 1 year and/or a fine of $2,500 for a first offence. Subsequent offences will bring significantly more incarceration time and/or a higher fine. Penalties for hash and concentrates are the same as they are for marijuana flower.

Connecticut

Medical use only

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Connecticut has decriminalized marijuana. However, marijuana is available in Connecticut for medical purposes. This has been the case since 2012, a year after Connecticut decriminalized marijuana in 2011. Qualifying patients may possess a one-month’s supply of cannabis. Governor Dannel Malloy is to thank for this, as he stated:

“Let me make it clear – we are not legalizing the use of marijuana. In modifying this law, we are recognizing that the punishment should fit the crime, and acknowledging the effects of its application… There is no question that the state’s criminal justice resources could be more effectively utilized for convicting, incarcerating and supervising violent and more serious offenders.”

Though we here at Doctor Frank agree with Malloy in some parts and disagree with others, we think this is a step in the right direction. In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Connecticut

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. Physical meeting not necessary.

Cost

$100

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 31 days

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

1 month’s supply of cannabis, to be determined by physician’s recommendations.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) aka Lou Gehrig’s Disease
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intractable Spasticity
  • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Post-surgical back pain
  • Post-Laminectomy Syndrome
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Severe Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Sickle Cell Disease
  • Terminal Illness requiring End-of-Life Care
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder

Medical Marijuana Laws

No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Connecticut. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Connecticut before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Connecticut.

Governor Dannel P. Malloy signs House Bill 5389 (HB 5389). This bill legally requires a patient to register with the Department of Consumer Protection, protecting them from arrest or prosecution, or being penalized in any manner.

Instructions for how to register for the program were posted on the Connecticut Medical Marijuana Program in 2012. The draft regulations were posted onto their website in 2013, when applications fully started.

The first dispensary was opened in 2014. There are currently around 11 dispensaries in Connecticut at the moment, with another due to open.

Patients may possess up to 1 month’s supply of cannabis, which will be determined by the recommendations the physician makes.

Home cultivation is not allowed

Cannabis has been decriminalized to some extent in Connecticut, but recreational marijuana is not legal.

Connecticut does not have reciprocity with other states, meaning dispensaries and law enforcement do not see out-of-state medical marijuana cards as valid.

Connecticut has a tax rate of $3.50 per gram if owner possesses 42.5 g or more.

Delaware

Medical use only

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Delaware’s Medical Marijuana Program is a bit of a minefield. This is because, while cannabis can still be recommended by physicians with a license to practice in Delaware, the state’s program has largely been suspended. Though terminally ill patients can still get a medical marijuana referral, possession of up to an ounce is still punishable by a fine. Carry any more, and the possibility of criminal proceedings and jail time increases.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

There have been changes in the law in recent times, as the law in Delaware surrounding medical marijuana was amended and expanded in order to prevent prosecutions of the sick and to extend the Medical Marijuana Program to terminally ill patients.

Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Delaware …

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 35 days; usually around 14 days.

Cost

$125

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

6 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Decompensated cirrhosis (often a side-effect of Hepatitis C)
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Autism
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Severe or debilitating pain
  • Severe nausea
  • Conditions that cause seizures
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, such as those caused by multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Terminal illness

Medical Marijuana Laws

2011 – Senate Bill 17 (SB17) is signed by Governor Jack Markell. Those with written certification by a physician recommending the use of marijuana may use and possess it, providing they stay within state restriction limits. Home cultivation is prohibited.

2012 – Delaware’s implementation of dispensaries (“compassion centers”) is held back by policy changes at the federal department of justice, much to the disappointment of Governor Markell.

2013 – Governor Markell sends a letter to Delaware lawmakers stating intentions to relaunch the state’s medical marijuana program.

2015 – Delaware’s first medical marijuana dispensary opens, near Wilmington.

2015 – “Rylie’s Law” is implemented. This means minors with intractable epilepsy or dystonia. Minors may not use any smokable form of cannabis, and the preparation they use must be a minimum of 15% CBD and a maximum of 7% THC and/or 15% THCA.

Delaware has decriminalized cannabis possession to some extent. Any person without a medical marijuana card who’s in possession of under 1 ounce for personal use is issued with a fine of up to $100 for a first offense (a Civil Penalty). Possession of up to 175 grams is considered a Misdemeanor, and may bring a sentence of up to 3 months incarceration and/or a $575 fine. Repeat offenders may get higher sentences and fines.

As for medical marijuana patients, the possession limit is up to 6 ounces.

Home cultivation is not allowed.

There is no caregiver program.

Recommendations are allowed for those under 18, if the recommendation is made by a pediatric specialist. Pediatric and adolescent patients can only possess oils with a minimum content of 15% CBD and/or 15% THCA. The maximum THC allowance for pediatric and adolescent patients is 7%.

No reciprocity with other states.

Applicants must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for a medical marijuana card for themselves.

Illinois

Medical use only

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Illinois’ Medical Marijuana Program is far stricter than in many other states. Patients and primary caregivers cannot cultivate their own cannabis, and a maximum of 2.5 ounces (70g) of usable cannabis can be bought from a intrastate source (i.e. a dispensary) over a period of 14 days.

The divide between medical and non-medical marijuana users in Illinois is stark. Recreational use and possession can lead to a civil infraction and fine of up to $200 for amounts of 10g, and higher fines and/or prison for larger amounts. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Illinois …

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Up to 45 days.

Cost

$100 for new patients. $50 for veterans or those enrolled in a federal Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces over a 14-day period.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Spinal cord disease (including arachnoiditis)
  • Tarlov cysts
  • Hydromyelia syringomyelia
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Fibrous dysplasia
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-concussion syndrome
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA)
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Myoclonus
  • Dystonia
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy
  • Complex regional pain syndromes types I and II (CRPS I/CRPS II)
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Lupus
  • Interstitial cystitis
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Nail-patella syndrome
  • Residual limb pain
  • Autism
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Terminal illness
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Medical Marijuana Laws

2013 – House Bill 1 (HB 1) is approved and signed into law by Governor Pat Quinn, entitled “The Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act”. This established the right for patients and their appointed caregivers to be protected from arrest, prosecution or denial of any right or privilege. Provisions for cultivation centers and dispensaries are also outlined.

2014 – Department of Public Health released revised rules for the implementation of medical marijuana laws.

2014 – Governor Quinn signs Senate Bill 2636 (SB 2636), which allows for those aged under 18 to access non-smokable medical cannabis for all the same conditions those aged 18 or over can be recommended cannabis. Epilepsy is added to the list of qualifying conditions.

2016 – Senate Bill 10 (SB 10) extends the Illinois Pilot Program to 2020.

Patients with a valid medical marijuana card may possess 2.5 ounces of cannabis per 14-day period.

Home cultivation is prohibited.

State-licensed dispensaries are allowed, but none are operational as of yet.

Caregivers must be aged 18 or over, and may only serve one patient who is too sick to pick up their medication, and is homebound.

Cannabis is decriminalized in Illinois. Possession of 10 grams or less is a Civil Violation, and can bring with it a fine of up to $200. Possession of any more than 10 g and less than 30 is considered a misdemeanor and can bring with it prison time of up to one year and/or a $1,000 fine. Subsequent offenses bring a mandatory minimum sentence of at least one year, increasing if the possession amount is greater than 10 grams.

Sale or trafficking of less than 2.5 g of cannabis is a misdemeanor and can bring an incarceration period of 6 months and/or a fine of $1,500. Cultivation of 5 plants or less brings similar penalties, as does sale or distribution of paraphernalia.

Penalties for hash and concentrates are similar to those of dried cannabis flower.

Civil asset forfeiture is a possibility when charged.

Maryland

Medical use only

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Maryland has allowed marijuana for medical use, but there are stiff penalties for recreational use, even if marijuana is decriminalized (usually used to fine marijuana users and put them into drug treatment). Like a few other states where medical marijuana is legal for those with a valid card and permission, Maryland has no dispensary as of yet.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

For those who are in need of relief from what could be chronic and debilitating conditions, here’s a guide to getting hold of a Medical Marijuana Card in Maryland:

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

Cost

$50

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 30 days, although there may be some backlogs and some have complained of it taking much longer.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

30-day supply, to be determined by physician’s recommendation.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, aka Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Any condition where medical marijuana may be helpful, as determined by a physician

Medical Marijuana Laws

2014 – House Bill 881 (HB 881) is approved by Governor Martin O’Malley. This tasked the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission with developing regulations for patients and dispensaries, including licensing, fees and possession limits.

2016 – The Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission is allowed to issue the number of dispensary licenses available.

2017 – Doctors and nurses may make a medical marijuana recommendation as long as they are licensed by the Maryland Board of Nursing, Maryland Board of Physicians, the Podiatrist Medical Examiners or the Maryland Board of Dental Examiners. Registry is mandatory for providers in order to start issuing medical marijuana cards.

State-licensed dispensaries are operational.

There is no caregiver program.

Home cultivation is prohibited.

Up to a 30-day supply of cannabis can be issued for patients.

There is no reciprocity with other states.

Possession of up to 10 g for personal use is a Civil Offense and can bring a fine of up to $100.

Possession of between 10 g and less than 50 pounds is a misdemeanor, and can bring up to 1 year in prison and/or a $1,000 fine.

Possession of 50 pounds or more is a felony, with a minimum mandatory sentence of 5 years and/or a fine of $100,000. Intending to distribute more than 50 pounds will get you the label of “drug kingpin”, and can mean a mandatory sentence of at least 5 years and, in cases with multiple offenses (e.g. cultivation) may bring the mandatory minimum up to 20 years and/or a $1,000,000 fine.

Penalties for hashish and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

Possession of paraphernalia is a Civil Offense, and though there is no penalty, paraphernalia may be confiscated and a criminal charge may go on record, especially if it’s a repeat offense. Sale/advertising may bring you a misdemeanor charge and a $500 fine. Subsequent violations could mean up to 2 years in prison and/or a $2,000 fine.

Trafficking more than 45 kg into Maryland can bring up to 25 years in prison and a fine of $50,000. Less than 45 kg and more than 5 kg, and the sentence is 10 years and a $10,000 fine.

Possession of a firearm with cannabis will bring stiffer penalties.

Cultivation is treated as possession. However, cultivation may be seen as a sign as wanting to distribute, so this depends on how many plants a person is growing and how much produce they get.

Minnesota

Medical use only

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Minnesota law treats marijuana as a controlled substance and recreational marijuana is still illegal. Meaning you there are penalties for possession, use and dealing. Possession of more than 42.5g in Minnesota will land you with a felony, less than 42.5g and you will receive a $200 fine unless you are registered as a patient. While medical marijuana was legalized in Minnesota, this will only be prepared in the form of liquid, pill or vaporized.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Minnesota …

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

14 – 30 days

Cost

$200 annually. For those on Social Security disability, Supplemental Security Insurance or who are enrolled onto MinnesotaCare, the fee is $50.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

30-day supply, to be determined by physician’s recommendation. Smokeable preparations prohibited.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer, associated with severe or chronic pain, nausea or severe vomiting, or cachexia or severe wasting syndrome
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) or Lou Gehrig’s Disease
  • Seizures, including those characteristic of Epilepsy
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Terminal illness with a life expectancy of less than one year.
  • Severe or chronic pain
  • Nausea or severe vomiting
  • Cachexia/severe wasting
  • Intractable pain, effective August 2016.

Medical Marijuana Laws

2014 – SF 2470 is approved and signed into law by Governor Mark Dayton. State penalties for those using or possessing cannabis are removed.

2016 – Intractable pain is added to the list of conditions medical marijuana may be recommended for.

Home cultivation is not allowed.

Patients may possess a limit of a 30-day supply of non-smokable medical marijuana.

No more than 8 dispensaries to be operational at any one time.

Only marijuana in liquid or oil is permitted to be used.

Minnesota has decriminalized cannabis to an extent, with no charge (and a conditional discharge for a first offense) for those in possession of 42.5 g or less of cannabis. A maximum fine of $200 may be issued. This is the same for giving away up to 42.5 g of cannabis without remuneration.

Possession or sale of any more than 42.5 g is a felony, and can bring with it up to 5 years’ incarceration and/or a $10,000 fine.

Those caught with cannabis may also be required to attend a drug education course.

Penalties for possession of hashish or concentrates is treated equally to marijuana.

Conviction for possession may result in a 30-day driver’s license ban.

Cultivation is treated similarly to possession. Remember, though: cultivating may be seen as “possession with intent to distribute”, meaning higher sentences.

Possession of paraphernalia and sale or advertising of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, and can bring a fine of between $300 and $1,000.

Montana

Medical use only

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In order to to cultivate, buy or use marijuana in Montana, you must have a registry ID card, or a Medical Marijuana Card, as it’s more commonly referred to. For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

In Montana, registered cardholders are limited up to 12 seedlings, although 4 mature flowering plants can be grown in private, and you can carry one ounce of usable marijuana.

Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Montana …

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

Cost

$75

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 30 days

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

A registered cardholder who has named a provider may possess up to 1 ounce of usable marijuana. If the cardholder has not named a provider may possess up to 4 mature plants, 4 seedlings and the amount of usable marijuana allowed by the department by rule.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Positive status for human immunodeficiency virus
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Severe chronic pain significantly interferes with daily activities as documented by the patient’s treating physician and by:
    – objective proof of the cause of the pain
    – second opinion from independent Doctor
  • Intractable nausea or vomiting
  • Epilepsy or an intractable seizure disorder
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Painful peripheral neuropathy
  • A central nervous system disorder

Medical Marijuana Laws

No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in Montana. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in Montana before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in Montana.

2004 – Voters approved Initiative 148, removing state-level criminal penalties for those with a medical marijuana card.

2011 – SB 423 is passed and the application process changed somewhat. SB 423 meant patients required a Montana-specific driver license or state-issued state ID card, as well as a second recommendation by a physician when patients were using cannabis for chronic pain.

2016 – Initiative 182 is approved, and some of the restrictions on medical marijuana in SB 423 and SB 143 are changed, reinstating the state’s original medical marijuana laws. This means that patients with a debilitating illness and physician’s recommendation are allowed to access marijuana for medicinal purposes.

A registered cardholder who has named a provider may possess up to one ounce of usable marijuana.

A registered cardholder who has not named a provider may possess up to 4 mature plants, 4 seedlings and the amount of usable marijuana allowed by the department by rule.

If there are two or more medical marijuana patients in the same residence, the maximum number of mature plants and seedlings allowed is 8.

Caregiver programs are operational, but they cannot provide for more than 2 patients (3 if the caregiver is also a patient) at a time, and must be a resident of the state of Montana.

Dispensaries are operational in Montana.

Those without a medical marijuana card and in possession of cannabis may well be charged with a misdemeanor or felony, depending on the amount carried. Carrying 60 g or less (1 g or less hashish/concentrates) for a first offence may mean up to 6 months incarceration and/or a $500 fine. A second offence can mean up to 3 years incarceration and/or a $1,000 fine.

Possession of more than 1 g of hashish/concentrates is considered a felony, and can bring charges of up to 5 years in prison and/or a $1,000 fine. Manufacturing hashish and concentrates can bring a 10 year sentence and/or a $50,000 fine.

Carrying any amount more than 60 g is considered a felony in Montana, and can carry charges of 5 years or more incarceration and/or a $50,000 fine. Intent to distribute any amount can bring 20 years incarceration and/or a $50,000 fine.

Sale or delivery of any amount of cannabis – with or without compensation – will bring a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year or more. Selling or distributing within 1,000 feet of school grounds will bring a mandatory minimum sentence of 3 years, and a sale from an adult to a minor a mandatory minimum sentence of 2 years. All sentences may carry a maximum fine of $50,000.

Those who cultivate more than 1 lb of cannabis face a minimum of 2 years imprisonment and may face life imprisonment. Cultivating less than 1 lb can bring between up to 10 years, but any any subsequent offences may be punishable by twice the imprisonment and twice the fine. Fines of up to $50,000 may be issued regardless of the amount cultivated.

Possession, manufacture or distribution of paraphernalia is considered a misdemeanor and bring a 6 month incarceration spell and/or a $500 fine. Selling paraphernalia to anyone under 18 can bring heavier sentences and fines.

Possessing marijuana on a train results in additional fines and/or penalties.

Storing marijuana results in additional fines and/or penalties.

Anyone convicted of a misdemeanor must attend a mandatory drug education course.

Continuing the cultivation and/or use may after being caught the first time may be punishable by double or triple fine and/or imprisonment.

Felonies may be eligible for suspended/deferred imposition. This means a sentence may be served by including a commitment to drug treatment and rehabilitation, community service and/or driver’s license revocations.

In Montana, marijuana is considered a Schedule I hallucinogenic substance.

Doctors who recommend more than 25 patients a year are referred to the board of medical examiners.

New Hampshire

Medical use only

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Marijuana is legal for medical use in New Hampshire. As a patient, people are permitted to carry up to two ounces, but patients are not allowed to cultivate at home and there are few state-licensed dispensaries in New Hampshire.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in New Hampshire …

 

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Up to 30 days, although some have waited longer.

Cost

$50

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • ALS
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy induced anorexia
  • Chronic pancreatitis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Elevated intraocular pressure
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C (currently receiving antiviral treatment)
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Lupus
  • Moderate to severe vomiting
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Nausea
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • Seizures, including those associated with Epilepsy
  • Severe pain (that has not responded to previously prescribed medication)
  • Spinal cord injury or disease
  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Wasting syndrome

Medical Marijuana Laws

2013 – House Bill 573 (HB 573) is introduced and signed into law by Governor Maggie Hassan. This bill established a registry identification system and the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis Advisory Council.

2014 – the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHSS) started proposing rules for the regulation of cannabis, and published the “Therapeutic Cannabis Program Registry Rules”.

2015 – DHSS starts issuing Registry Identification Cards.

2016 – Dispensaries open.

2017 – Possession of up to 1 ounce of marijuana for personal use is decriminalized. This is reduced to approximately 21 g, or ¾ of an ounce. Possession of up to 21 g of cannabis for a first or second offense is considered a Civil Violation and brings with it a fine of up to $100.

Possession of over 21 g is considered a misdemeanor and carries an incarceration period of up to 1 year and/or a fine of $350. Possession of up to 5 g of hash or concentrates is also a Civil Violation. Possession of more than 5 g of hash is a misdemeanor, and manufacturing concentrates or hash is a felony.

Possession limit for medical marijuana patients is 2 ounces.

No more than four licensed dispensaries to be operational at any one time.

No caregiver program.

Sale or possession with intent to sell is a felony, with up to 3 years in prison and/or a $25,000 fine for any amount less than 1 ounce. 1 oz – 5 lbs, and it goes up to 7 years’ incarceration and/or a $100,000 fine. More than 5 lbs, and it’s up to 20 years’ imprisonment and/or a fine of $300,000.

Cultivation is held to similar standards as possession or possession with intent to sell.

Subsequent offenses or offenses taking place within 1000 feet of school grounds and bring stiffer and higher penalties.

New Jersey

Medical use only

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New Jersey has a Medical Marijuana Program (MMP) that affords patients legal protection under the New Jersey Medical Marijuana law. Like several other states throughout the United States (and unlike several others), patients are not allowed to cultivate their own marijuana. Patients must buy their marijuana from a licensed dispensary. Registration is also mandatory for medical marijuana in New Jersey.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. If your state offers telehealth, Dr. Frank may be able to consult with your primary doctor or surgeon as well.

new jersey marijuana laws

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician in-person.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 30 days

Cost

$200. However, those on state assistance programs may be able to get a reduced fee of $20.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2 ounces per month.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Seizure disorders such as epilepsy or skeletal muscular spasticity
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Cancer
  • Severe nausea or vomiting, cachexia, wasting syndromes and so on from chemotherapy or radiotherapy
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Terminal illnesses where the physician has determined a length of life of 12 months or less

Medical Marijuana Laws

2010 – Senate Bill 119 (SB 119) is signed into law by Governor Jon Corzine, protecting patients with debilitating illnesses and giving them the right to apply for a medical marijuana card and protect them from arrest and prosecution.

2010 – Draft rules outlining the application and registration process for medical marijuana are released.

2011 – Senate Concurrent Resolution 140 (SCR 140) is submitted by Senator Nicholas Scutari, declaring “Board of Medical Examiners proposed medicinal marijuana program rules are inconsistent with legislative intent”. New rules are created to streamline the application and permit process for cultivating and dispensing cannabis, and home delivery is prohibited.

2012 – Patient registration is opened by by the New Jersey Medical Marijuana Program. The first dispensary opens up.

2013 – Senator Chris Christie signs Senate Bill 2842 (SB 2482), qualifying use of medical marijuana in edible form for minors with debilitating conditions, upon approval of a physician and a psychiatrist.

Patient must be aged 18 or over in order to apply for a MMJ card for themselves.

Possession limits for those with a valid medical marijuana card is 2 ounces per month.

Home cultivation is prohibited.

Dispensaries are operational.

Primary caregiver must be a resident of New Jersey, and have never been convicted of a violent or drug offense. Caregiver must be aged 18 or older, and can only have one qualifying patient at any one time.

For those without a valid MMJ card, possession of 50 g or less  (or 5 g or less of hash) may get them labelled a “Disorderly Person”, with up to 6 months’ incarceration and/or a $1,000 dollar maximum fine. This is the same with using or possessing paraphernalia. More than 50 g, and it’s a crime, with 1.5 years’ incarceration and a maximum fine of up to $25,000.

Possession within 1000 feet of a school adds 100 hours community service and a larger fine, in addition to any other penalties.

Possession with intent to distribute near a school will carry a minimum mandatory sentence of 3 years. Sale to minors or a pregnant woman carries a double term of imprisonment and fine.

Cultivation has a mandatory minimum imprisonment of 3 years and a maximum fine of $25,000.

Selling paraphernalia is a crime and can bring up to 18 months in prison and/or a maximum fine of $10,000.

Being under the influence of marijuana is a misdemeanor.

Failing to turn marijuana over to an officer is a misdemeanor.

Driving privileges may be revoked and suspended for between 6 months and 2 years. This is guaranteed if the person caught is under 17.

 

New York

Medical use only

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Medical Marijuana is legal in New York, and can be obtained and used safely, without fear of police arrest if you have a Medical Marijuana Card. If you’re coming over from New York and staying in California for work, family, friends or more, and you qualify for medical marijuana card in New York, why not come see Dr. Frank? Book an appointment online today, and you can even take your examination online, too.

Here is how to get your MMJ card in New York:

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. It is not necessary to see the physician in-person. However, physician must be licensed by the state of New York and be qualified and certified to recommend medical marijuana.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

7 – 15 days

Cost

$50

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

A 30-day supply of non-smokeable cannabis. Supply to be determined by the physician.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Amyotrophic
  • Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Intractable Spasticity
  • Epilepsy
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Neuropathies
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Severe or chronic pain
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures
  • Severe or persistent muscle spasms

Medical Marijuana Laws

No prior relationship with a physician is required in order to qualify for medical marijuana in New York. However, doctors must be licensed to practice in New York before they can recommend cannabis for a patient in New York. However, in New York, doctors must pass a test and gain a qualification in order to recommend cannabis.

2014 – Assembly Bill 6357 (AB 6357) was approved and signed into law by the New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. This removed state-level penalties for medical marijuana patients with a signed, written physician’s recommendation letter.

2015 – Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill enabling an expedited certification process for seriously ill patients.

2016 – The first 8 (of the expected 20) medical marijuana dispensaries are opened.

2017 – NY’s medical marijuana program is expanded, allowing for a greater range of products to be sold in dispensaries. New dispensary procedures were also introduced. Patients will be able to walk into a dispensary and speak with a representative about their treatment options.

In order to qualify for the medical marijuana program in New York, patients must be diagnosed with a severe, debilitating and/or life-threatening condition. Associated or complicating conditions may also be taken into account.

Patients must have a bonafide relationship with their recommending doctor. However, physical examination is not needed – a relationship can be developed via telehealth.

Doctors must complete a 2-hour certification course and be in good standing with the state of NY in order to recommend cannabis for patients.

Only non-smokable forms of cannabis are allowed to be used. This means lotions, lozenges, topicals (ointments, lotions and patches), tinctures, edibles and chewables.

The maximum possession limit is a 30-day supply.

Home cultivation is not allowed as of yet, although the new bills signed in 2017 may put a change to this, to some extent at least.

There is a Caregiver program in New York. Unlike in many other states, a medical marijuana patient in New York may have up to 2 caregivers. Caregivers may have a maximum of 5 patients.

There is no reciprocity with other states with legalized medical marijuana.

Recreational marijuana is decriminalized to some extent in New York, but not legalized.

There is an excise tax of 7% on medical marijuana.

 

Ohio

Medical use only

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Ohio has recently established a Medical Marijuana Program (MMP). So far, the state allows for a maximum of a 90-day supply of medical marijuana, although how much this is precisely is yet to be decided. Registration to the Ohio MMP is mandatory, and patients must possess a valid Medical Marijuana Identification Card (MMIC) in order to take advantage of the state’s MMP.

Those of you who are from Ohio and looking to visit California ought to book an appointment with Dr. Frank in order to get their medical marijuana card. You can take your appointment online if getting to California from Ohio proves to be too difficult. Of course, if you’re in town, feel free to book an appointment with Dr. Frank in-person, too.

In the meantime, here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in Ohio …

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. However, relationship must first be established between patient and physician, whether in-person or via telehealth.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Expect 30 – 60 days, as the medical marijuana program needs time to begin operations.

Cost

$50

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

No possession limits specified as of yet. Cannabis products may be dispensed as oils, tinctures, edibles, patches or herbal material.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) aka Lou Gehrig’s Disease
  • Cancer
  • Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Chronic or Intractable Pain
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Spinal Cord Disease or Injury
  • Tourette Syndrome
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Ulcerative Colitis

Medical Marijuana Laws

2016 – Governor John Kasich signs House Bill 523 (HB 523), allowing for the use of marijuana for medical reasons. HB 523 allows for a patient to carry a 90-day supply of cannabis. Smoking cannabis is not approved, and only oils, patches, herbal material and tinctures are approved methods.

No possession limits determined as of yet for medical marijuana patients.

Home cultivation is prohibited.

Some legal protections for qualifying patients who acquire cannabis from out-of-state sources prior to the operation of state-licensed dispensaries.

For those without a medical marijuana card and recommendation, cannabis is decriminalized in Ohio to a certain extent. Possession of less than 100 g  (5 g solid hashish or 1 g liquid concentrate) doesn’t bring any charges, is a misdemeanor and has a maximum fine of $150. Possession of more than 100 g is a misdemeanor, but may bring with it up to 30 days’ jail time and/or a $250 fine. Possessing any more than 200 g is a felony.

Gifting someone cannabis 20 g or less is a misdemeanor with a $150 fine. A second offense may bring 60 days in jail and a $500 fine.

Selling any amount of cannabis is a felony. Previous convictions of drug offenses bring harsher punishments, as does selling or possessing to a minor or anywhere near school grounds.

Cultivation is seen as possession, although may be used as evidence of intention to distribute, depending upon how much yield and how many plants the offender has.

Possession of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor and can bring with it a $150 fine.

Sale of paraphernalia brings a maximum fine of up to $750.

Any drug conviction, including possession/sale of paraphernalia, may result in a driving license suspension of between 6 months and 5 years.

 

Rhode Island

Medical use only

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Marijuana is legal for medical consumption in Rhode Island, where it is legal to carry 2 and a 1/2 ounces, and to cultivate up to 12 plants and 12 seedlings. There is a laidback stance on cultivation, but the state only has 3 dispensaries.

For anyone looking to come to California who’s in need of a Medical Marijuana Card, book an appointment and have a chat with Dr. Frank, online or in-person. Rhode Island allows for medical marijuana card (MMC) recommendations online via telehealth without the need for a prior relationship with a physician. Se up an appointment from Dr. Frank today and see how he can help you – Dr. Frank may be able to recommend you due to Rhode Island’s reciprocity laws.

Telehealth/In-Person

Telehealth/telemedicine available. In-person appointment is not needed.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 21 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

15 – 30 days

Cost

$100. For patients on Medicaid or Supplemental Income (SSI), the fee is $10.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

2.5 ounces

Qualifying Conditions

  • Cancer or the treatment of this condition
  • Glaucoma or the treatment of this condition
  • Positive status for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or the treatment of this condition
  • Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or the treatment of this condition
  • Hepatitis C or the treatment of this condition
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Severe, debilitating, chronic pain
  • Severe nausea
  • Seizures, including but not limited to those characteristic of epilepsy
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, including but not limited to those characteristic of multiple sclerosis or
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Agitation related to Alzheimer’s Disease

Medical Marijuana Laws

2005 – After much legal wrangling, Senate Bill 0710 (SB 0710) is passed through. It becomes known as the Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act.

2007 – SB 791 is passed, removing the repeal date for the Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Act and expand the definition of a primary caregiver.

2009 – H5359 is passed and includes instructions for the sale, creation, administration and regulation of medical marijuana dispensaries.

2013 – The first compassion center (aka medical marijuana dispensary) is opened.

Possession limit is up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis for those with a valid medical marijuana recommendation and card.

Cultivation of up to 12 plants and 12 seedlings is allowed for those with a MMJ card. All plants must be grown in one location, and two or more cardholders may cultivate cannabis cooperatively.

No more than 48 mature plants, 48 seedlings and 10 ounces of usable marijuana can be grown cooperatively in a non-residential space.

In a residential space, no more than 24 mature plants, 24 seedlings and 10 ounces of usable marijuana can be grown.

For those without a medical marijuana card, possession of less than 1 ounce is a Civil Violation with no incarceration and a maximum fine of $150.

Possession of between 1 ounce and 1 kilogram of cannabis is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year imprisonment and a $500 fine.

Possession of any more than 1 kg is considered “with intent to distribute”. This is a felony, and can bring a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years and a fine of $500,000. Anything more than 5 kg of cannabis, and it’s 25 years-to-life for cannabis.

Cultivating cannabis may bring up to 30 years’ imprisonment and a fine of $100,000, if not more.

Penalties for hash and concentrates are the same as for marijuana.

Manufacture, sale, delivery or possession of paraphernalia is up to 2 years’ incarceration and a $5,000 fine.

Possession whilst driving will result in a suspension of up to 6 months.

West Virginia

Medical use only

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Medical marijuana became legal in West Virginia in 2017. There is no medical marijuana program (MMP) operational as of yet in West Virginia. Here’s a guide to getting a medical marijuana card in West Virginia …

High Point, North Fork Mountain, West Virginia
http://www.forestwander.com

Telehealth/In-Person

No telemedicine policy in place. HB 4463 and SB 320 would permit the practice of telemedicine.

How Old Do I Have to Be to Apply for a Medical Marijuana Card?

18 years old or over. Caregivers must be 18 years old or over.

How Long Does it take to Get My MMJ Card?

Expect 30 – 90 days, as West Virginia’s medical marijuana program is yet to begin.

Cost

Unknown as of yet. Medical marijuana program is yet to start.

Possession Limit (Medical Marijuana Patients)

Patients may possess up to a 30-day supply, but no specifics are available as to what the 30-day supply constitutes or who can determine the amount a patient needs over 30 days. Medical marijuana patients cannot possess herbal cannabis, and must instead use cannabis-infused oils or liquids that can be vaporized. Topicals, patches or tinctures are also deemed acceptable forms of usage.

Qualifying Conditions

  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Refractory generalized anxiety disorder (Refractory GAD)
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Conditions that cause persistent muscle spasms
  • Epileptic seizures
  • Severe nausea and vomiting
  • Anorexia
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • Any debilitating illness or disease that requires hospice or palliative care, or is terminal

Medical Marijuana Laws

2017 – Governor Jim Justice signs Senate Bill 386 (SB 386), legalizing cannabis for medical purposes. The bill was introduced by Senator Richard Ojeda. Medical marijuana cards will be issued as of 2019.

Patients are permitted to possess a 30-day supply of cannabis-infused products. Patients may not possess herbal cannabis. Only pills, oils, topicals, tinctures or patches. Smoking cannabis is not permitted.

Home cultivation is prohibited.

Dispensaries are permitted, but not operational as of yet.

Caregiver program is available. Patients may have up to 2 caregivers at once. Caregivers may not have more than 5 patients under their care.

No reciprocity with other states, as of yet.

For those without a medical marijuana card (unlikely until 2019), possession of any amount of marijuana is considered a misdemeanor, with between 90 days and 6 months incarceration and a maximum fine of up to $1,000.

Sale or trafficking cannabis in West Virginia is a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year, and up to 5 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of up to $15,000.

Selling, manufacturing, advertising or distributing paraphernalia carries a minimum mandatory sentence of 6 months and up to 1 year imprisonment. There is a maximum fine of up to $5,000.

Penalties for hashish and concentrates are the same as those for marijuana.

Attempting to adulterate a drug screening test is a misdemeanor, with up to 1 year incarceration and/or a $10,000 fine.

Driver’s license may be revoked for any offense when a motor vehicle is in use.